Summary Dmitry Borisovich Kabalevsky

Summary Dmitry Borisovich Kabalevsky

DMITRY BORISOVICH KABALEVSKY

The genus. in 1904

Kabalevsky is one of the most active and versatile representatives of Soviet music. Composite creativity, he successfully combines with pedagogical, musical-critical and social activities. The music of Kabalevsky is permeated with the living breath of modern times. His heroes are the Soviet people, our youth. Various aspects of Soviet reality were expressed in the music of the composer. She is characterized by soft lyricism and harsh drama, subtle humor and heroic pathetic.

Dmitry Borisovich Kabalevsky was born in St. Petersburg on December 30 (new century) in 1904. In 1918 he moved to Moscow with his family. Love for music, especially for improvisations on the piano, determined the choice of profession. The composer was educated at the Scriabin Music School, then at the Moscow Conservatoire, which he graduated in 1929 in composition class N. Myaskovsky, and a year later – in the piano class of A. B. Goldenweiser. The name Kabalevsky was entered on the marble board of distinction. Already in the 1930s, his work was distinguished by its diversity and intensity. In the Poem of Struggle for the Choir and Orchestra (1930), three symphonies, the Second Piano Concerto (1936), in songs, music for movies and dramatic performances, Kabalevsky addressed themes and images of modern times. The peak of this period was the opera “Cola Bryunion” (based on Romain Rolland’s novel, 1937). During the

Great Patriotic War the composer created a number of major works: the cantata “Motherland Great” (1942), the suite “People’s Avengers” for chorus and orchestra (1942), opera “In Fire” (1943). In the post-war period, along with chamber works, he wrote a triad of instrumental concerts dedicated to Soviet youth – violin, cello and piano (1948-1952). At the same time, the operas The Family of Taras (1947-1950) and Nikita Vershinin (1954) were created. The most significant works of the subsequent period were the Fourth Symphony (1956) and The Requiem (R. Rozhdestvensky, 1963). for choir and orchestra (1942), opera “In Fire” (1943). In the post-war period, along with chamber works, he wrote a triad of instrumental concerts dedicated to Soviet youth – violin, cello and piano (1948-1952). At the same time, the operas The Family of Taras (1947-1950) and Nikita Vershinin (1954) were created. The most significant works of the subsequent period were the Fourth Symphony (1956) and The Requiem (R. Rozhdestvensky, 1963). for choir and orchestra (1942), opera “In Fire” (1943). In the post-war period, along with chamber works, he wrote a triad of instrumental concerts dedicated to Soviet youth – violin, cello and piano (1948-1952). At the same time, the operas The Family of Taras (1947-1950) and Nikita Vershinin (1954) were created. The most significant works of the subsequent period were the Fourth Symphony (1956) and The Requiem (R. Rozhdestvensky, 1963).


Summary Dmitry Borisovich Kabalevsky