Summary Miserly Knight

Summary Miserly Knight



A. Pushkin The
Miserly Knight
The young knight Albert is going to come to the tournament and asks his servant Ivan to show a helmet. The helmet is penetrated through the past duel with the knight Delormej. It is impossible to put it on. The servant comforts Albert by the fact that he repaid Delorzhu in full, knocking him out of the saddle with a mighty blow, from which the offender Albera lay dead for a day and hardly recovered until now. Albert says that the cause of his courage and strength was the frenzy over the damaged helmet. The guilt of heroism is stinginess. Albert complains of poverty, the embarrassment that prevented him from removing the helmet from the defeated enemy, says that he needs a new dress, that he alone has to sit at the duke’s table in lats, while other knights flaunt in satin and velvet. But there is no money for clothes and weapons, and Albert’s father is an old baron-a miser. There is no money to buy a new horse, and the permanent creditor of Albert, Jew Solomon, according to Ivan, refuses to continue to believe in debt without a mortgage. But there is nothing to lay the knight. The moneylender does not yield to any persuasion, and even the argument that Albert’s father is old, will soon die and leave his son with all his enormous fortune, does not convince the lender.
At that time, Solomon himself appears. Albert tries to solicit his money from him, but Solomon, although softly, nevertheless resolutely refuses to give money even for an honest chivalric word. Albert, upset, does not believe that his father can survive him, Solomon says that in life everything happens that “our days are not counted by us,” and the baron is strong and can live for another thirty years. In despair, Albert says that in thirty years he will be fifty, and then he will hardly need money. Solomon argues that money is needed at any age, only “the young man in them is looking for servants of the agile,” “the old man sees in them friends of reliable.” Albert claims that his father himself serves money, like an Algerian slave, “like a dog chain.” He denies himself everything and lives worse than a beggar, and ” the gold is calm in the chests. “Albert hopes that someday it will serve him, Albert, seeing Alber’s despair and his readiness for everything, Solomon hints at him that the death of his father can be brought about with the help of poison. but Solomon



immediately wants to hang Solomon at the gates of the castle, Solomon, knowing that the knight is not joking, wants to pay off, but Albert throws him out. “After coming to his senses, he intends to send a servant to the moneylender to accept the money offered, but rethinks, because It seems to them that they will smell venom, he demands to serve wine, but it turns out that the wine in the house is not a drop. “Albert decides to seek a council for the father of the duke, who must make the old man keep his son, as befits a knight. that someday it will serve him, Albert. Seeing Alber’s despair and his readiness for everything, Solomon hints at him that the death of his father can be brought about with the help of poison. At first, Albert does not understand these hints. But, having clarified the matter, he wants to immediately hang Solomon at the gate of the castle. Solomon, realizing that the knight is not kidding, wants to pay off, but Albert chases him away. Recovering himself, he intends to send a servant to the usurer to accept the money offered, but he changes his mind, because it seems to him that they will smell like poison. He demands to serve wine, but it turns out that there is not a drop of wine in the house. Cursing such a life, Albert decides to seek a council for the father of the duke, who must force the old man to support his son, as befits a knight. that someday it will serve him, Albert. Seeing Alber’s despair and his readiness for everything, Solomon hints at him that the death of his father can be brought about with the help of poison. At first, Albert does not understand these hints. But, having clarified the matter, he wants to immediately hang Solomon at the gate of the castle. Solomon, realizing that the knight is not kidding, wants to pay off, but Albert chases him away. Recovering himself, he intends to send a servant to the usurer to accept the money offered, but he changes his mind, because it seems to him that they will smell like poison. He demands to serve wine, but it turns out that there is not a drop of wine in the house. Cursing such a life, Albert decides to seek a council for the father of the duke, who must force the old man to support his son, as befits a knight. that the death of the father can be brought about with the help of poison. At first, Albert does not understand these hints. But, having clarified the matter, he wants to immediately hang Solomon at the gate of the castle. Solomon, realizing that the knight is not kidding, wants to pay off, but Albert chases him away. Recovering himself, he intends to send a servant to the usurer to accept the money offered, but he changes his mind, because it seems to him that they will smell like poison. He demands to serve wine, but it turns out that there is not a drop of wine in the house. Cursing such a life, Albert decides to seek a council for the father of the duke, who must force the old man to support his son, as befits a knight. that the death of the father can be brought about with the help of poison. At first, Albert does not understand these hints. But, having clarified the matter, he wants to immediately hang Solomon at the gate of the castle. Solomon, realizing that the knight is not kidding, wants to pay off, but Albert chases him away. Recovering himself, he intends to send a servant to the usurer to accept the money offered, but he changes his mind, because it seems to him that they will smell like poison. He demands to serve wine, but it turns out that there is not a drop of wine in the house. Cursing such a life, Albert decides to seek a council for the father of the duke, who must force the old man to support his son, as befits a knight. he intends to send a servant to a moneylender to accept the money offered, but he changes his mind, because it seems to him that they will smell like poison. He demands to serve wine, but it turns out that there is not a drop of wine in the house. Cursing such a life, Albert decides to seek a council for the father of the duke, who must force the old man to support his son, as befits a knight. he intends to send a servant to a moneylender to accept the money offered, but he changes his mind, because it seems to him that they will smell like poison. He demands to serve wine, but it turns out that there is not a drop of wine in the house. Cursing such a life, Albert decides to seek a council for the father of the duke, who must force the old man to support his son, as befits a knight.
The Baron descends into his cellar, where he keeps chests of gold, so that in the sixth chest, not yet full, pour a handful of coins. Looking at his treasures, he recalls the legend of the king, who ordered his soldiers to put on a handful of earth, and as a result grew a giant hill from which the king could look around vast spaces. His own treasures, collected on crumbs, the baron likens this hill, which makes him the ruler of the whole world. He remembers the history of each coin, behind which are the tears and grief of people, poverty and destruction. It seems to him that if all the tears, blood and sweat, shed for this money, were now coming from the earthly interior, then there would be a flood. He pours a handful of money into the chest, and then unlocks all the chests, puts lighted candles before them and admires the glitter of gold, feeling himself the ruler of a mighty power. But the idea that, that after his death the heir will come here and lavish his wealth, leads the baron into fury and indignation. He believes that he has no rights to this, that if he had himself accumulated these treasures by his hardest work, he would certainly not have thrown gold to the left and to the right.
In the palace, Albert complains to the duke on his father, and the duke promises to help the knight, persuade the baron to support his son, as befits. He hopes to awaken the father’s feelings in the baron, for the Baron was a friend of his grandfather and played with the duke when he was still a child.
The baron approaches the palace, and the duke asks Albert to be buried in the next room while he talks to his father. The Baron appears, the duke greets him and tries to evoke in him the memories of youth. He wants the baron to appear at the court, but the baron is dissuaded by old age and infirmity, but promises that in case of war he will have the strength to draw a sword for his duke. The duke asks why he does not see the baron’s son at court, to which the baron replies that the son’s dark character disfigures him. The Duke asks the Baron to send his son to the palace and promises to teach him to have fun. He demands that the baron appoint a son to be a proper knight. Pmarachnev, the Baron says that his son is unworthy of the duke’s care and attention, that he is “vicious,” and refuses to comply with the duke’s request. He says that he is angry with his son, that he was plotting patricide. The Duke threatens to bring Albert to justice for this. The Baron says that his son intends to rob him. Hearing these slander, Alber bursts into the room and accuses his father of lying. An angry baron throws his glove at his son. With the words “Thank you, this is my father’s first gift,” Albert accepts the challenge of the Baron. This incident plunges the duke into amazement and anger, he takes Alber’s glove from the baron and drives his father and son away. At this moment, with the words on the keys on the lips, the baron dies, and the duke complains about “an awful age, terrible hearts.” Albert accepts the summons of the Baron. This incident plunges the duke into amazement and anger, he takes Alber’s glove from the baron and drives his father and son away. At this moment, with the words on the keys on the lips, the baron dies, and the duke complains about “an awful age, terrible hearts.” Albert accepts the summons of the Baron. This incident plunges the duke into amazement and anger, he takes Alber’s glove from the baron and drives his father and son away. At this moment, with the words on the keys on the lips, the baron dies, and the duke complains about “an awful age, terrible hearts.”




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Summary Miserly Knight