What are the verb phrases

What are the verb phrases

Types of word combinations by stem word

Depending on the affiliation of the main word to one or another part of speech, the lexico-grammatical types of word combinations differ: verbal, nominal and adverbial. In more detail, the classification by such a feature can be represented as follows.

– Verbal word combinations with a dependent noun and pronoun:

Unprejudiced. for example: to buy bread, to pity people, to write with a pencil, to fill with water, to like it;

Prepositional. for example: go to the pier, sit down on the ground, talk with a friend, think about life, settle down by the road, get out of the influence, turn to him.

– Verbal word combinations with a dependent infinitive or gerundive. for example: ask to come, offer a rest, go to

the hospital; go without looking, sit thinking.

– Verb phrases with an adverb. for example: to act correctly, to express vaguely, to tell fascinatingly, to repeat twice, to double, to settle at the top.

– Substantive word combinations (with the main word – noun):

With a noun as a dependent word:

Unprejudiced. for example: the threshold of the house, the speech of the president, the secretary of the meeting, a glass of water, dinner time;

Prepositional. for example: a table under a tree, pain from a bruise, an excerpt from a composition, people from the street, a bottle of milk, a danger to the child, the road to the heart, swimming under water, details about the process;

With the adjective as a dependent word: iron bed, useful work, active participation, sable cap;

With a pronominal adjective as a dependent word, for example: my book, your family, every person, every morning, someone’s story;

With the ordinal numerals as a dependent word, for example: the second day, the sixth company;

With communion as a dependent word, for example: a read book, an ironed shirt, a loving woman;

With an adverb as a dependent word, for example: hit backhand, walk on foot, cap on one side, coffee in Turkish;

With an infinitive as a dependent word, for example:

the intention to return, the ability to tell, the desire to flash.

– Adjective phrases (with the main word – adjective):

With a noun as a dependent word:

Unprejudiced. for example: full of embarrassment, submissive to fate, pathetic with weakness;

Prepositional. for example: black from sunburn, harmful to health, the last of the horsemen, ready to leave, black with graying;

With a pronoun as a dependent word:

Unprejudiced. for example: we need you, pleasant to you;

Prepositional. for example: close to yourself, difficult for us;

With an adverb as a dependent word, for example: in summer green, friendly caring, very scary, pretty nice, old-fashioned stoop, empty inside;

With an infinitive as a dependent word, for example: ready to fight, capable of loving.

– Phrase words with a numeral (including substantivized) as the main word, for example: the third from the end, the first of three, the fifth of passengers, two books, three in greatcoats.

– Phrases with pronoun as the main word. for example: each of us, my brother and I.

Adverbs with an adverb as a dependent word, for example: very cleverly, very skillfully, quite the same, too sharply, barely audible, quite recently, far behind, deliberately loud.

Adverbial phrases with a noun as a dependent word:

Unprejudiced. for example: in the autumn of last year, faster than a bird (to fly), better than a friend;

Prepositional. for example: funny to tears, away from friends, low over the earth, shortly before the holiday.


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What are the verb phrases