“Memoirs of the Earl of Graham” by Hamilton in short summary

“Memoirs of the Earl of Graham” by Hamilton in short summary


In the romanized biography of his relative, Chevalier de Gramont, the author draws contemporary manners of the French nobility and the English court of the Restoration period.

The reader gets acquainted with the hero during the military operations in Piedmont, where he thanks to a lively mind, sense of humor and hardness of the spirit immediately conquers the general sympathy. “He was looking for fun and gave it to everyone.” His friend is a certain Mutta, “an example of sincerity and honesty,” and together they ask excellent dinners, which all the officers of the regiment gather. However, the money soon ends, and friends are racking their brains to fill their funds. Suddenly, Gramon remembers about the inveterate player, the rich Count Cameras. Friends invite the count to dinner, and then Gramon sits down with him to play. The count loses a huge amount in debt, but the next day he pays regularly, and “lost well-being” returns to friends. Now, to the very end of the campaign, fortune favors them, and Gramont even does charity work: donates money to soldiers who were maimed in battles. Having won glory in the field of battle, the Chevalier de Gramont and Mutta go to Turin, overwhelmed by the desire to win laurels in a love affair. Friends are young, witty, littered with money, and therefore they are very kindly received at the court of the Duchess of Savoy. And although Matt’s gallantry of the Turin court seems excessive, he relies on a friend in everything. Chevalier chooses a young brunette for her, Mademoiselle de Saint-Germain, and offers her a friend to look after the charming blonde Marquise de Senant. The marquise’s husband is so rude and disgusting that “it was a sin not to deceive him.” Announcing their love, both adventurers immediately dress in the colors of their ladies: Gramon in green, and Mutta in blue. Matta, unfamiliar with the ritual of courtship, unnecessarily tightly grasps the handle of the charming marquise, than causes anger of the girl. However, Mutta does not notice it and goes to a pleasant company for supper. The next day at the court, where Mutta appeared immediately after the hunt, that is, without the flowers of his lady, an explanation occurs: the lady reproaches him for insolence-he almost tore off her hand! The marquis echoes Gramont: how dare he appear not in blue! By this time, the Chevalier remarks that Giuseppe de Sentant “very favorably” refers



to himself, and decides, just in case, not to miss this opportunity, if suddenly fail with Saint-Germain. how he dared not appear in blue! By this time, the Chevalier remarks that Giuseppe de Sentant “very favorably” refers to himself, and decides, just in case, not to miss this opportunity, if suddenly fail with Saint-Germain. how he dared not appear in blue! By this time, the Chevalier remarks that Giuseppe de Sentant “very favorably” refers to himself, and decides, just in case, not to miss this opportunity, if suddenly fail with Saint-Germain.

Marquise de Senant is quite satisfied with the impatient Mutta, and in her heart she has long agreed to fulfill all his desires, but he does not want to “put the dragon,” that is, her husband: he is too disgusted. Realizing that Mutta does not intend to compromise his principles, Madame de Senant ceases to be interested in them. At the same time the Chevalier de Gramont parted with his beloved, for she flatly refused to transgress the line of the permitted, preferring to get married before, and only then to enjoy the joys with a friend of the heart. De Gramon and the Marquise de Senant are conspiring to deceive both husband and friend, so that they can quietly enjoy love. To this end, the Chevalier de Gramont, who for a long time already has a friendly relationship with the Marquis de Centant, cleverly acquaints him with Matt. De Senant invites friends for dinner, However, the Chevalier pronounces himself the permission to be late, and while Mutta, in abundance absorbing the food, tries to answer the abstruse questions of Sentant, Gramon hurries to the marquis. However, Mademoiselle de Saint-Germain, who had told about this, wishing to annoy the fan who turned away from her, is also with the Marquise and as a result leads her away from home, so that the disappointed Gramon has no choice but to go out to dinner with Senant. However, the Chevalier does not abandon his intention, only now, to implement it, he plays a whole spectacle. Convincing everyone that Senant and Matta had quarreled, he, allegedly wanting to prevent a duel, persuades both friends to spend the day at home, and he rushes to the gentle Madame de Senant, who accepts him so “that he fully knew her gratitude.” He tries to answer Senant’s abstruse questions, Gramon hurries to the marquis. However, Mademoiselle de Saint-Germain, who had told about this, wishing to annoy the fan who turned away from her, is also with the Marquise and as a result leads her away from home, so that the disappointed Gramon has no choice but to go out to dinner with Senant. However, the Chevalier does not abandon his intention, only now, to implement it, he plays a whole spectacle. Convincing everyone that Senant and Matta had quarreled, he, allegedly wanting to prevent a duel, persuades both friends to spend the day at home, and he rushes to the gentle Madame de Senant, who accepts him so “that he fully knew her gratitude.” He tries to answer Senant’s abstruse questions, Gramon hurries to the marquis. However, Mademoiselle de Saint-Germain, who had told about this, wishing to annoy the fan who turned away from her, is also with the Marquise and as a result leads her away from home, so that the disappointed Gramon has no choice but to go out to dinner with Senant. However, the Chevalier does not abandon his intention, only now, to implement it, he plays a whole spectacle. Convincing everyone that Senant and Matta had quarreled, he, allegedly wanting to prevent a duel, persuades both friends to spend the day at home, and he rushes to the gentle Madame de Senant, who accepts him so “that he fully knew her gratitude.” also is to the marquise and as a result leads her away from home, so that the disappointed Gramont has no choice but to go out to dinner with Senant. However, the Chevalier does not abandon his intention, only now, to implement it, he plays a whole spectacle. Convincing everyone that Senant and Matta had quarreled, he, allegedly wanting to prevent a duel, persuades both friends to spend the day at home, and he rushes to the gentle Madame de Senant, who accepts him so “that he fully knew her gratitude.” also is to the marquise and as a result leads her away from home, so that the disappointed Gramont has no choice but to go out to dinner with Senant. However, the Chevalier does not abandon his intention, only now, to implement it, he plays a whole spectacle. Convincing everyone that Senant and Matta had quarreled, he, allegedly wanting to prevent a duel, persuades both friends to spend the day at home, and he rushes to the gentle Madame de Senant, who accepts him so “that he fully knew her gratitude.”

Returning to France, the Chevalier de Gramon brilliantly confirms his reputation: he is playful in the game, active and tireless in his love, a dangerous rival in heart affairs, inexhaustible in fiction, unruffled in victories and defeats. Being an intelligent person, de Gramont gets to the card table to Cardinal Mazarin and quickly notices that his Eminence is cheating. Using “talents granted to him by nature,” the Chevalier begins not only to defend himself, but also to attack. So, in cases where the Cardinal and the Chevalier are trying to outsmart each other, the Chevalier has the advantage. De Grahamon does a great job with various assignments. Once Marshal Tyurenn, defeating the Spaniards and removing the siege from Arras, sends de Gramont as a messenger to the royal court. The clever and brave Chevalier bypasses all other couriers, seeking the first to deliver the glad tidings, and receives a reward: the queen’s kiss. The king is also affectionate with the messenger. And only the cardinal looks sour: his foe, Prince Conde, whose death in the battle he had hoped for, is alive and well. Leaving the office, the chevalier, in the presence of numerous courtiers, releases a caustic joke about Mazarin. Of course, informants inform the cardinal about this. But “not the most vindictive of the ministers” does not take the glove, but, on the contrary, invites the Chevalier to dinner and the game the same evening, assuring that “the queen will bet for them.” chevalier in the presence of numerous courtiers releases a caustic joke about Mazarin. Of course, informants inform the cardinal about this. But “not the most vindictive of the ministers” does not take the glove, but, on the contrary, invites the Chevalier to dinner and the game the same evening, assuring that “the queen will bet for them.” chevalier in the presence of numerous courtiers releases a caustic joke about Mazarin. Of course, informants inform the cardinal about this. But “not the most vindictive of the ministers” does not take the glove, but, on the contrary, invites the Chevalier to dinner and the game the same evening, assuring that “the queen will bet for them.”

Soon young Ludovik marries, and in the kingdom everything changes. “The French adore their king.” The king, while engaged in the affairs of the state, does not forget about his love interests. It is enough for His Majesty to look at the courtly beauty, how he immediately finds a response to her heart, and the admirers humbly leave the lucky woman. Chevalier de Gramon, delighted with the zeal of the sovereign in the affairs of government, nevertheless dares to encroach upon one of the maids of honor, a certain Mademoiselle Lamotte-Wudarkour, who has the good fortune to please the king. The maid of honor, preferring the love of the king, complains to Louis of the intrusiveness of de Gramont. Immediately the Chevalier is denied access to the court, and the latter, realizing that he has nothing to do in France in the near future, is leaving for England. England at this time rejoices on the occasion of the restoration of the monarchy. Charles II, whose youthful years passed in exile, is full of nobility, just like his few adherents from among those who shared with him his fate. Its court, brilliant and refined, amazes even Gramon, accustomed to the splendor of the French court. There is no English court and a lack of charming ladies, but all of them are far from the real gems – Mademoiselle Hamilton and Mademoiselle Stewart. Chevalier de Grahamon is quickly becoming the general favorite: unlike many French people, he does not refuse local dishes and easily adopts English manners. Coming to the liking of Charles, he is allowed to royal entertainment. Chevalier plays rarely, but in a big way, although, despite the persuasions of friends, he does not try to multiply his state by playing. Do not forget the Chevalier and about the love adventures, taking care of several beauties at once. But he should get acquainted with Mademoiselle Hamilton, as he immediately forgets his other hobbies. For some time, de Gramont is even in a state of confusion: in the case of Mademoiselle Hamilton, neither ordinary gifts nor the methods of winning the hearts of the court coquette are helpful; this girl deserves only sincere and serious affection. Everything is absolutely in it: beauty, mind, manners. Her feelings are distinguished by an extraordinary nobility, and the more the Chevalier is convinced of her merits, the more she tries to please her. Everything is absolutely in it: beauty, mind, manners. Her feelings are distinguished by an extraordinary nobility, and the more the Chevalier is convinced of her merits, the more she tries to please her. Everything is absolutely in it: beauty, mind, manners. Her feelings are distinguished by an extraordinary nobility, and the more the Chevalier is convinced of her merits, the more she tries to please her.

In the meantime, the star of Mademoiselle Stewart rises in the courtly sky. She gradually displaces from the heart of the king the capricious and sensual Countess Castlemein, who, being absolutely certain that her power over the king is unlimited, cares first of all to satisfy her own whims. Lady Castlemein begins to attend the performances of the famous rope walker Jacob Hall, whose talent and strength delight the audience, and especially the female part of it. It is rumored that the tightrope walker did not deceive the Countess’s expectations. While evil tongues are gossiping about Castlemaine, the king becomes more and more attached to Stewart. Subsequently, the Countess Castlemein married Lord Richmond.

Chevalier de Gramont does not miss a single amusement, where there is Mademoiselle Hamilton. Once, wishing to shine on a royal ball, he orders his valet to deliver him from Paris the most fashionable jacket. The valet, fairly shabby, returns on the eve of the ball with empty hands and claims that the suit drowned in the quicksand of the English coast. Chevalier is at the ball in an old coat and in justification tells this story. The king laughs to the point. Subsequently, the deceit of the valet is revealed: after drinking hard, he sold the master’s suit for a fabulous price to some provincial Englishman.

Roman Chevalier with Mademoiselle de Gramont is developing successfully. It can not be said that he has no rivals, however, knowing the price of their virtues and at the same time the mind of Mademoiselle Hamilton, he worries only about how to please his lover. Friends are wary of the Chevalier: Mademoiselle Hamilton is not one to be seduced, so it’s about marriage. But the Chevalier’s position, as well as his condition, is very modest. The girl has already rejected many brilliant parties, and her family is very picky. But the chevalier is confident: he marries a chosen one of his heart, reconciles with the king, he will make his wife a stat-lady, and “with God’s help” he will increase his state. “And I bet it will be like I said.” Immediately say that he was right.



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“Memoirs of the Earl of Graham” by Hamilton in short summary