The hero’s dependence on public opinion

The hero’s dependence on public opinion

The worst thing for Famusov and his followers is bad reputation in society. “Sin does not matter, the rumor is not good,” says Sophia Lisa, who from the inside has studied the mores that reign in the house. FAMUSOVA cares only what impression he will make in the world, and not what kind of person he really is. According to such principles all the old-Moscow nobility lives. This is evidenced by some extra-cost images of comedy. For example, Famusov sincerely admires Maxim Petrovich, his uncle, whose main virtue was the ability to “podsluzhatsya.”

This ability brought him wealth and respect in society. Such is Famusov in Griboyedov’s comedy “Woe from Wit”, and hence all the conservative nobles.

Excessive love for ranks and money deprives representatives of the “last century” of freedom. It was not for nothing that Chatsky, their opponent, called this period of Russian history the age of “obedience and fear.” The highest point of absurdity, this dependence of the nobles on public opinion reaches in the finale of the comedy, when Famusov is concerned about not the state of his daughter, but with “what will Princess Marya Aleksevna say.”


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The hero’s dependence on public opinion