What does Aesop’s fable “Peasant and his sons” teach us?

What does Aesop’s fable “Peasant and his sons” teach us?

In the 6th century BC there lived a man called Aesop. According to legend, he was a slave from Phrygia. Subsequently, he was released to freedom and he lived for some time at the court of the Lydian king Krez.

Why did the name of this man survive the millennium? He is a fabulist. He was credited with the plots of almost all known fables in antiquity. A large collection of Aesop Fables has survived.

What are these fables about? On cunning and laziness, about diligence and honesty, about the generosity of the soul and respect for man.

Here, for example, the fable “The peasant and his sons.” It seemed that there was something special? The peasant’s sons digged the soil well, which gave the collection of grapes more abundant than before. However, the sons did not do this work with dreams about the future harvest. They were looking for a treasure. And it was so. A father who worked all his life on the ground, before he died, managed to entice his sons to farming. He said, “My children, I’m dying. Search our vineyard, in it you will find all that I have hidden.” The sons decided that it was a buried treasure. So they rummaged the whole vineyard. You can imagine their disappointment when they did not find any treasure! Nevertheless, their efforts have benefited. On a well-plowed soil, many grapes were born. And if there is a harvest, then, and profit in the family. Treasure is the ability to work. That’s what the old peasant considered a treasure. This is taught by Aesop’s fable.

And Aesop himself, as the legend says, was finally thrown off the cliff for sacrilege. Who now remembers the names of his tormentors? But the name of the legendary poet Aesop is known all over the world.


What does Aesop’s fable “Peasant and his sons” teach us?