Teaching and education in Byzantium

Teaching and education in Byzantium

In Byzantium, the career of an official was considered prestigious. It required a certain degree of education, which encouraged young people to learn.

Education was not available to everyone, since there were few state schools, only clergy used to prepare church and monasteries, and private ones were paid. In addition, books were a luxury, not everyone could buy them. Yet there were more literate people among the common people in Byzantium than in the West.

The peasants gave their sons for training to the master in the city. Some of the aristocrats gave their children a higher education. But most aristocrats prepared their sons for a military career and did not burden them with sciences. The children studied differently: some diligently, others preferred to hang out, attend sports competitions, feasts, wander from nothing to do in the streets, etc.

The girls were taught alone – how to be a woman and mother, their freedom was limited. The girl’s birth rejoiced less than the boy.

Some education could be received everywhere, but good – only in Constantinople. Therefore, the “second Rome”, like a magnet, attracted young people from all corners of the empire.


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Teaching and education in Byzantium