Summary of Zola E

Summary of Zola E

Emile Zola (Fr. Émile Zola, April 2, 1840, Paris – September 29, 1902, ibid.) Is a French writer.
One of the most significant representatives of realism in the second half of the nineteenth century, the leader and theorist of the so-called naturalistic movement, Zola stood at the center of the literary life of France during the last thirty years of the nineteenth century and was associated with the greatest writers of that time (Lunches of Five (1874) , Turgenev, Dode and Edmond Goncourt, Medan’s evenings (1880) – a famous collection, including works by Zola himself, Huysmans, Maupassant and a number of secondary naturalists like Sear, Annick and Alexis).
The son of an engineer of Italian descent who received French citizenship (in Italian, the surname is read as Zola), who built the canal in Aix. Zola began his literary career as a journalist (cooperation in “L’Evenement”, “Le Figaro”, “Le Rappel”, “Tribune”); many of his first novels are typical “novel-feuilletons” (“Marcel secrets” – “Les mysteres de Marseille”, 1867). Throughout his subsequent career Zola keeps in touch with journalism (collections of articles: “Mes haines”, 1866, “Une campagne”, 1881, “Nouvelle campagne”, 1886). These performances are the active participation of the artist in the political life of his time.
Political biography Zola is

not rich in events. This is the biography of a liberal acting in the period of capitalist upsurge. In the last period of his life, Zola gravitated toward a socialist worldview, without going beyond the framework of radicalism.
As the highest point of Zola’s political biography, his participation in the Dreyfus affair should be noted, which revealed the contradictions of France in the 1890s, the famous J’accuse (“I blame”), which cost the writer of exile to England (1898).
Zola died in Paris from carbon monoxide poisoning, according to the official version – due to a malfunction of the chimney. His last words addressed to his wife were: “It’s bad for me, my head is splitting up.” Look, and the dog is sick. “Probably we ate something, nothing, everything will pass.” “Do not disturb anyone…”. Contemporaries suspected that this could be a murder, but it was not possible to find incontrovertible proofs of this theory.
In honor of Emile Zola called the crater on Mercury.


Summary of Zola E