Summary “Indiana”

Summary “Indiana”

The novel takes place in the era of Restoration, a time when everyone still remembers both the events of the revolution and the rule of Napoleon. In the living room of the castle of De la Bree near Paris, three men sit: the master of the house, Colonel Delmar, once a brave military man, now “heavy and bald,” his nineteen-year-old wife, the charming fragile Creole of Indiana, and her distant relative, Sir Ralph Brown, “a man in full bloom of youth and strength. ”
The servant reports that someone has climbed into the garden, and the colonel grabs his gun and runs away. Knowing the harsh nature of her husband, Indiana is afraid, as if he had not killed someone hot.
The colonel comes back. Sed behind him servants carry an insensitive young man “with

delicate, noble features.” Blood flows from the wound on his arm. Justifying himself, the colonel claims that he shot only salt. Creole Nun, the nurse and Indiana maid, together with her mistress, are busy around the wounded. The gardener reports that this “very handsome man” is Mr. de Rumière, their new neighbor. In the colonel, jealousy awakens.
Having regained consciousness, de Rumière explains his misdeed by striving to penetrate the Colonel’s factory near the house and to find out the secret of its prosperity, for his brother in the south of France has the same enterprise, however, he brings him only losses. Delmar once refused to talk on this subject with Ramier, so he, wishing to help his brother, dared to violate the boundaries of the colonel’s possessions. Mr. Delmar is satisfied with his explanation.
The truth is that “brilliant and witty”, “endowed with various talents” Raymond de Rumière is in love with Nun, and an ardent Creole answers him in kind. That evening they had a date in the Delmar garden.
The young man’s feelings are so strong that he even thinks about going to the misalliance and legalizing their relationship. However, gradually his passion fades, he begins to be uneasy Nun and hurries to return to Paris. The inconsolable Creole writes
sincere, but awkward letters, which only make her laugh.
The secular lion de Rumiere meets Indiana in one of the Paris salons. Young people remember their first meeting in the castle of De la Bree. Indiana is subdued by the charm of Raymond, in her soul she awakens love. Early married to Mr. Delmar, “stupid, tactless and ill-mannered,” the young Creole loves for the first time, because to her faithful friend, Sir Ralph, she feels exceptionally friendly feelings. Raymond is also captivated by a timid beauty.
Lovers are explained. Indiana’s love is pure and selfless, in the sense of Raymond there is a fair amount of vanity and selfishness. The position of the young man is complicated by the presence of Nun, who, seeing him at Mrs. Delmar, decides that he came to the house for her.
Thinking that Raymond still loves her, Nun, in the absence of the hosts, invites him to the Delmar Castle. Fearing that Indiana would not know about his novel with her maid, Raymond agrees to come to Nun, hoping that this meeting will be the last. During a stormy night of love in Indiana’s bedroom, the Creole confesses to her lover that she is expecting a baby. Raymond is horrified, he wants to send Nun away from Paris, but she does not agree.
Unexpectedly, Mrs. Delmar returns. Nun, unaware of Ramier’s new fascination, is going to confess everything to the hostess. Raymond forbids it. Finding a young man in his bedroom, Indiana decides that he has come here for her, and accuses Nun of aiding the dishonest designs of the young man. However, the behavior of the maid gives the true reason for Raymond’s appearance in the castle. His embarrassment confirms Indiana’s suspicions, her feelings are offended, and she drives him away. De Ramier wants to explain himself to Indiana, but the arrival of Sir Ralph forces him to leave the castle hastily. Nun realizes that there is nothing to hope for, and rushes into the river. Indiana still loves Raymond, but Nun’s death, in which she rightly blames the young man, fills her with disgust for him. She refuses to see him. Aspiring to again win the favor of Mrs. Delmar, Raymond resorts to the help of his mother. On the rights of neighbors, they together pay a visit to the colonel. As the mistress of the house, Indiana is forced to go out to the guests. Having shown interest in the work of the factory and respectfully speaking about the overthrown Bonaparte, Ramier is gaining the sympathy of M. Delmar and the right to visit him at home without ceremony; He again finds the way to the heart of Indiana and receives her forgiveness. Sophisticated in secular tricks the Frenchwoman would not have succumbed so easily to his seductions, but the inexperienced Creole believes him. Indiana expects that Raymond will love her “completely, irrevocably, unlimitedly”, ready for her any sacrifice. Captured by the “irresistible charm” of a young woman, de Ramier promises everything that is demanded of him. Raymond wants to get proof of Indiana’s love.


Summary “Indiana”