“Black Prince” A. Murdoch in brief summary

“Black Prince” A. Murdoch in brief summary

The text of Bradley Pearson’s book The Black Prince, or the Feast of Love is framed by the foreword and afterword of the publisher, from which it follows that Bradley Pearson died in prison of transient cancer, which he opened shortly after he finished the manuscript. Wanting to restore the honor of a friend and remove from him the accusation of murder, the publisher and published this “story about love – after all, the history of creative struggles of man, the search for wisdom and truth – it is always a story about love… Every artist is an unfortunate lover, and unhappy lovers love tell your story. “

In his preface Bradley Pearson talks about himself: he is fifty-eight years old, he is a writer, although he published only three books: one rash novel when he was twenty-five, one more – when he was over forty, and a small book “Excerpts” or ” Etudes “. His gift he kept clean, which means, among other things, the lack of writer’s success. However, his faith in himself and his sense of calling, even of doom, did not loosen – he saved enough money for a comfortable life, he left the post of tax inspector to write – but he was overcome by creative dumbness. “Art has its martyrs, among them the last place is occupied by the silent.” For the summer he took a house by the sea, thinking that there at last his silence would break.

When Bradley Pearson was standing over the packed

suitcases, preparing to leave, his old brother-in-law Francis Marlo suddenly came to him after many years with the news that his ex-wife Christian was widowed, returned from America as a rich woman and was eager to meet. Over the years that Bradley did not see him, Francis turned into a fat, rude, red-faced, wretched, slightly wild, slightly insane, foul-smelling loser – he was stripped of his doctor’s diploma for manipulating drugs, he tried to practice as a “psychoanalyst”, drank heavily and Now, with Bradley’s help, I wanted to live with a rich sister at her expense. Bradley had not yet managed to throw him out the door, as Arnold Baffin rang, pleading with him to come to him at once: he killed his wife.

Bradley Pearson is extremely concerned that his description of Baffin was just, for the whole story is a history of relations with him and the tragic outcome to which they led. He, already a notorious writer, discovered Arnold when he, while working as a teacher of English literature at school, was just finishing his first novel. Pearson read the manuscript, found a publisher for it, and published a commendable review. From this began one of the most successful literary careers – from a monetary point of view: every year Arnold wrote according to the book, and his products corresponded to public tastes; fame and material prosperity came as they were. It was believed that Bradley Pearson is jealous of Arnold’s success in writing, although he himself believed that he achieved success by forgoing art. Their relationship was almost related – Pearson was at a wedding with Arnold and for twenty-five years almost every Sunday he dined with the Baffins; they, the antipodes, represented an inexhaustible interest for each other. Arnold was grateful and even betrayed by Bradley, but he was afraid of his court, perhaps because he himself, who had inexorably descended to the bottom of literary mediocrity, lived in the soul the same strict judge. And now Pearson is burned with a pocket review of Arnold’s latest novel, which can not be called laudatory, and he hesitates, unable to decide what to do with it. steadily descending to the bottom of literary mediocrity, lived in the soul the same strict judge. And now Pearson is burned with a pocket review of Arnold’s latest novel, which can not be called laudatory, and he hesitates, unable to decide what to do with it. steadily descending to the bottom of literary mediocrity, lived in the soul the same strict judge. And now Pearson is burned with a pocket review of Arnold’s latest novel, which can not be called laudatory, and he hesitates, unable to decide what to do with it.

Pearson and Francis go to Arnold. His wife Rachel closed in the bedroom and does not show signs of life. She agrees to let in only Bradley; she is beaten, sobbing, blaming her husband for not allowing herself to be herself and living her own life, insisting that she will never forgive him, and will not forgive Bradley for seeing her disgrace. Survey of Francis Marlo showed that there is no danger to life and health. Calmed down, Arnold told how he accidentally hit her with a poker in the course of the quarrel-no harm, such scandals are not uncommon in marriage, this is a necessary relaxation, “another face of love,” and in fact they are with Rachel a happy married couple. Arnold is keenly interested in the return to London of Christian, which Bradley Pearson did not like much, which does not tolerate gossip and gossip and would like to forget about his unsuccessful marriage. On the way home, reflecting, whether to stay on Sunday lunch, so that the Baffins’ natural dislike for the witness is not fixed and the relationship is settled, or whether to flee London as soon as possible, he saw in the twilight a youth in black who, muttering monotonous spells, threw under the wheels of cars some white petals. On closer examination, the young man turned out to be the daughter of the Buffins Julian – she performed a ritual to help forget her lover: she tore the letters into pieces and scattered them, repeating: “Oscar Belling”. Bradley knew her from the cradle and had a moderate kinship interest in her: he never wanted his children. Julian says hello to him and asks her to become her teacher, because she wants to write books, and not like her father, but like him, Bradley Pearson. or escape from London as soon as possible, he saw in the twilight a youth in black who, muttering monotonous spells, threw some white petals under the wheels of cars. On closer examination, the young man turned out to be the daughter of the Buffins Julian – she performed a ritual to help forget her lover: she tore the letters into pieces and scattered them, repeating: “Oscar Belling”. Bradley knew her from the cradle and had a moderate kinship interest in her: he never wanted his children. Julian says hello to him and asks her to become her teacher, because she wants to write books, and not like her father, but like him, Bradley Pearson. or escape from London as soon as possible, he saw in the twilight a youth in black who, muttering monotonous spells, threw some white petals under the wheels of cars. On closer examination, the young man turned out to be the daughter of the Buffins Julian – she performed a ritual to help forget her lover: she tore the letters into pieces and scattered them, repeating: “Oscar Belling”. Bradley knew her from the cradle and had a moderate kinship interest in her: he never wanted his children. Julian says hello to him and asks her to become her teacher, because she wants to write books, and not like her father, but like him, Bradley Pearson. On closer examination, the young man turned out to be the daughter of the Buffins Julian – she performed a ritual to help forget her lover: she tore the letters into pieces and scattered them, repeating: “Oscar Belling”. Bradley knew her from the cradle and had a moderate kinship interest in her: he never wanted his children. Julian says hello to him and asks her to become her teacher, because she wants to write books, and not like her father, but like him, Bradley Pearson. On closer examination, the young man turned out to be the daughter of the Buffins Julian – she performed a ritual to help forget her lover: she tore the letters into pieces and scattered them, repeating: “Oscar Belling”. Bradley knew her from the cradle and had a moderate kinship interest in her: he never wanted his children. Julian says hello to him and asks her to become her teacher, because she wants to write books, and not like her father, but like him, Bradley Pearson.

The next day Bradley decided to leave anyway, but as soon as he picked up his bags, his fifty-two-year-old sister Priscilla called at the door – she left her husband, and she had nowhere to go. Priscilla in hysterics; tears of regret over the ruined life and the abandoned mink stole flow like a river; When Bradley went out to put the kettle on, she drinks all her sleeping pills. Bradley is in a panic; comes Francis Marlowe, and then the Baffins – the whole family. When Priscilla is taken away by an ambulance, Rachel says that there was also Christian, but, finding the moment to meet with the former husband unfavorable, she left, accompanied by Arnold “in the tavern.”

Priscilla was discharged from the hospital that same evening. It is out of the question to leave immediately; and before Bradley the problem of Christian is coming up. He sees his ex-wife as an unchangeable demon of his life and decides that if Arnold and Christian get along, he will break off relations with Arnold. And when he meets Christian, he repeats that he does not want to see her. Having succumbed to Priscilla’s persuasion, Bradley goes to Bristol for her things, where she meets with her husband Roger; he asks for a divorce to marry his longtime mistress Marygold – they are waiting for the child. Feeling the pain and resentment of the sister as their own, Bradley, drunk, breaks Priscilla’s favorite vase and lingers in Bristol; Then Christian takes Priscilla, left in the care of Rachel, to herself. This leads Bradley into a frenzy, all the more powerful that he himself is guilty: ” I will not give you my sister, so you will feel sorry for her and humiliate her. “Rachel takes him to comfort and feed lunch and tells how much Arnold and Christian are getting closer. She offers Bradley to start a romance with her, concluding an alliance against them, convinces that the novel Kiss Rachel strengthens his emotional turmoil, and he gives her to read his review of Arnold’s novel, and in the evening gets drunk with Francis Marlowe, who, interpreting the situation according to Freud, explains that Bradley and Arnold love each other, are obsessed with each other and that Brad Does he consider himself a writer only in order to identify himself with the object of love, that is, Arnold? However, he quickly recoils before Bradley’s objections and confesses that in fact a homosexual is himself, Francis Marlowe. Rachel takes him to comfort and feed lunch and tells how closely Arnold and Christian got closer. She suggests that Bradley start a romance with her, by concluding an alliance against them, convinces that an affair with her can also help his creative work. Rachel’s kiss strengthens his emotional turmoil, and he lets her read his review of Arnold’s novel, and in the evening gets drunk with Francis Marlowe, who, interpreting the situation according to Freud, explains that Bradley and Arnold love each other, are obsessed with each other and that Bradley considers himself writer only in order to self-identify with the object of love, that is, Arnold. However, he quickly retreats before Bradley’s objections and confesses that in fact a homosexual is himself, Francis Marlowe. Rachel takes him to comfort and feed lunch and tells how closely Arnold and Christian got closer. She suggests that Bradley start a romance with her, by concluding an alliance against them, convinces that an affair with her can also help his creative work. Rachel’s kiss strengthens his emotional turmoil, and he lets her read his review of Arnold’s novel, and in the evening gets drunk with Francis Marlowe, who, interpreting the situation according to Freud, explains that Bradley and Arnold love each other, are obsessed with each other and that Bradley considers himself writer only in order to self-identify with the object of love, that is, Arnold. However, he quickly retreats before Bradley’s objections and confesses that in fact a homosexual is himself, Francis Marlowe. having concluded an alliance against them, convinces that an affair with her can also help his creative work. Rachel’s kiss strengthens his emotional turmoil, and he lets her read his review of Arnold’s novel, and in the evening gets drunk with Francis Marlowe, who, interpreting the situation according to Freud, explains that Bradley and Arnold love each other, are obsessed with each other and that Bradley considers himself writer only in order to self-identify with the object of love, that is, Arnold. However, he quickly retreats before Bradley’s objections and confesses that in fact a homosexual is himself, Francis Marlowe. having concluded an alliance against them, convinces that an affair with her can also help his creative work. Rachel’s kiss strengthens his emotional turmoil, and he lets her read his review of Arnold’s novel, and in the evening gets drunk with Francis Marlowe, who, interpreting the situation according to Freud, explains that Bradley and Arnold love each other, are obsessed with each other and that Bradley considers himself writer only in order to self-identify with the object of love, that is, Arnold. However, he quickly retreats before Bradley’s objections and confesses that in fact a homosexual is himself, Francis Marlowe. that Bradley and Arnold love each other, are obsessed with each other and that Bradley considers himself a writer only in order to identify himself with the object of love, that is, Arnold. However, he quickly retreats before Bradley’s objections and confesses that in fact a homosexual is himself, Francis Marlowe. that Bradley and Arnold love each other, are obsessed with each other and that Bradley considers himself a writer only in order to identify himself with the object of love, that is, Arnold. However, he quickly retreats before Bradley’s objections and confesses that in fact a homosexual is himself, Francis Marlowe.

Rachel, steadily implementing her plan for a romance alliance, puts Bradley in her bed, which ends anecdotically: her husband came. Running from the bedroom without socks, Bradley meets Julian and, wishing to formulate a sullen request not to tell anyone about this meeting, buys her purple boots, and in the process of fitting, when looking at Julian’s legs, he is overtaken by a belated physical desire.

Having come to visit Priscilla, Bradley, from a conversation with Christian, learns that Rachel complained to Arnold about his harassment; and Christian herself suggests that he remember their marriage, analyze the mistakes of the time, and then reunite on a new spiral turn.

Knocked out of rutting memories of the past and the latest events, tormented by the urgent need to sit down at the desk, having somehow attached Priscilla, Bradley forgets to be invited to a party organized in his honor by former employees, and forgets his promise to talk with Julian about “Hamlet “; when she comes on the appointed day and hour, he can not hide his surprise. Nevertheless, he reads a brilliant lecture impromptu, and after spending it, he suddenly realizes that he is in love. It was a blow, and he knocked Bradley off his feet. Realizing that there can be no question of recognition, he is happy with his secret love. “I was cleansed of anger and hatred, I had to live and love in solitude, and the consciousness of this made me almost god… I knew that the black Erot, overtaking me, was consubstantial with a different, more secret god.” He gives the impression of a blessed one: he gives Rachel everything that can be bought in a paper shop; reconciles with Christian; gives Francis five pounds and orders a complete collection of works by Arnold Baffin, to reread all his novels and find in them not seen before the dignity. He paid little attention to Arnold’s letter, in which he talks about his relationship with Christian and his intention to live in two families, as Rachel asks. But the rapture of the first days is replaced by the torments of love; Bradley does what he should not; opens his feelings to Julian. And she replies that she loves him too. He paid little attention to Arnold’s letter, in which he talks about his relationship with Christian and his intention to live in two families, as Rachel asks. But the rapture of the first days is replaced by the torments of love; Bradley does what he should not; opens his feelings to Julian. And she replies that she loves him too. He paid little attention to Arnold’s letter, in which he talks about his relationship with Christian and his intention to live in two families, as Rachel asks. But the rapture of the first days is replaced by the torments of love; Bradley does what he should not; opens his feelings to Julian. And she replies that she loves him too.

Twenty-year-old Julian does not see any other way of development of events, except to declare his love to his parents and get married. The reaction of the parents is immediate: locking her in the key and cutting off the telephone line, they come to Bradley and demand to leave their daughter alone; from their point of view, the lustful old man’s passion for a young girl can only be explained by insanity.

The next day Julian runs out from under the castle; feverishly contemplating where to hide from the righteous wrath of the Baffins, Bradley recalls the Villa Patara, leaves Priscilla, who fled Christian, to Francis Marlowe, and, literally for a second crossed at her door with Arnold, rents a car and takes Julian away.

Their idyll is broken by a telegram from Francis. Without telling Julian about it, Bradley contacts him by phone: Priscilla committed suicide. When he returned from the post office, Julian meets him in the costume of Hamlet: she wanted to surprise, reminding of the beginning of their love. So without telling her about Priscilla’s death, he finally takes possession of her for the first time – “we did not belong to ourselves… It’s rock.”

Arnold arrives at Pataru at night. He wants to take his daughter away, terrified that she does not know about Priscilla’s death, nor the true age of Bradley, passes her a letter from her mother. Julian remains with Bradley, but waking up in the morning, he discovers that she is not.

After the funeral of Priscilla, Bradley lies in bed for days and waits for Julian, not letting anyone in. He makes an exception only for Rachel – she knows where Julian is. From Rachel he learned what was in the letter brought by Arnold: there she described “her connection with Bradley.” She came, it seems, only then to say: “I thought that you understand that in my family life everything is in order”, Bradley absentmindedly takes up Arnold’s letter about the intention to live in two families, and at that moment in the door is ringing the messenger who brought the collection of works of Arnold Baffin. Rachel had time to read the letter – with a wild cry that she would not forgive this Bradley never, she runs away.

Bradley tears the books with fury.

A letter from Julian comes from France. Bradley immediately zasobiralsya on the road; Francis Marlo goes for tickets.

Rachel calls and asks to come to her immediately, promising to tell where Julian is; Bradley is on his way. Rachel killed Arnold with the same poker that he hit her once. The murder is accused of Bradley Pearson – all against him: cold-blooded testimony of Rachel, torn works, tickets abroad…

In the afterword, Bradley Pearson writes that most of all he was surprised by the strength of Rachel’s feelings. As for the charges put forward – “I could not justify myself in court, I was finally waiting for my own, rather heavy cross… These things do not rush.”

Complete the book with four afterwords of the four characters.

Afterword, Christian: she claims that she threw Bradley, because he could not provide her with a decent life, and when she returned from America, she molested her, and that he was obviously crazy: he considered himself happy, although in fact he was unhappy. And why so much noise around the art? But for people like Bradley, only that is important, than they do.

The afterword of Francis Marlowe: he refinedly proves that Bradley Pearson was homosexual and tender to him.

Afterword Rachel: she writes that the book is deceitful from the first to the last word that Bradley was in love with her, why she invented an unprecedented passion for her daughter, and that she sincerely sympathizes with the madman.

Afterword Julian, who became a poetess and Mrs. Belling, is an elegant essay on art. There are only three short sentences about the events described: “… it was love not subject to words, to his words, at any rate.” As an artist, he failed. “


“Black Prince” A. Murdoch in brief summary