Summary War and peace in volumes, parts and chapters. Volume 1

Summary War and peace in volumes, parts and chapters. Volume 1

In the first volume of the novel the author acquaints the reader with the actors and gives them characteristics that are then supplemented, but the first impression of each character is formed at the very beginning of the narrative. July of 1805. In the St. Petersburg salon, the maid of honor Anna Pavlovna Scherer gathers guests, a high society. “Being an enthusiast became her social position, and sometimes, when she did not even want to, she did an enthusiastic attempt not to deceive the expectations of people who knew her.” A restrained smile that constantly played on Anna Pavlovna’s face, although she did not go to her obsolete features, expressed how, like spoiled children, the constant consciousness of her own darling lack, from which she does not want, can not and

does not find it necessary to correct. ” Talks are held about Napoleon and about the forthcoming anti-Napoleonic coalition. All conversations are conducted almost in half in French. Prince Vasily Kuragin is one of the first to arrive. Scherer is informed about the health of his children, “woo” the youngest son of Prince Vasily (Anatoly Kuragin) for Marya Volkonskaya. Prince Vasily soberly treats his sons: “Hippolytus, at least, the deceased fool, and Anatole – restless.” Princess Drubetskaya asks Prince Vasily to transfer her son Boris to the adjutants of Kutuzov. Only to get rid of the obsessive lady and strengthen his influence in the world, Prince Vasily promises his help. In the salon there is the wife of Andrey Bolkonsky Lisa, who married last winter and now does not appear in the light due to her pregnancy, but also goes to small evenings. “Her pretty, with a slightly blackened mustache, the upper sponge was short in the teeth, but the nicer it was opened, and the more it was stretched more gracefully and fell on the lower one. As is always the case for quite attractive women, her lack of – shortness of lips and half-open mouth – seemed her special, actually her beauty. Everyone was happy to watch this pretty, expectant mother, who was so easily transferred her position. “Soon
after the little princess came in a massive, fat young man with a shorn head, wearing glasses, light pantaloons at the then fashion, with a high jabot and in a brown coat. This fat young man was the illegitimate son of the famous Catherine’s nobleman, Count Bezukhov, now dying in Moscow. He never served anywhere else, he just came from abroad, where he was brought up, and was the first time in society. “Next comes the daughter of Prince Vasili, the beautiful Helen, which goes, “looking at no one, but smiling at everyone and kindly giving everyone the right to admire the beauty of his camp… Helen was so good that not only was there no noticeable shadow of coquetry in her, but, on the contrary, it seemed to her was ashamed of her undoubted and too strong and victoriously acting beauty, she seemed to wish and could not detract from the effect of her beauty… “Tolstoy mentions several times the beautiful, half-naked at that time, Elena’s shoulders, making an indelible impression on everyone. Andrey Bolkonsky enters. He was of a small stature, a very handsome young man with definite and dry features, everything in his figure, from a tired, bored look to a quiet measured step, represented the sharpest contrast with his small, lively wife, all those who were in the living room were not only acquainted with him, but were already bored with him so that it was very boring to look at them and listen to them. “Pierre hears those present, led by a certain viscount, scold Napoleon, and begins to argue with them, saying that Napoleon – a great man and that ordinary people can not judge the plans and acts of genius: “The Bourbons fled from the revolution, giving the people anarchy; and one Napoleon knew how to understand the revolution, to defeat it, and therefore for the common good he could not stop before the life of one person… Napoleon is great because he became higher than the revolution, suppressed her abuses, retaining all good – and equality of citizens, and freedom words and press – and only because it acquired power. “The viscount objects that freedom and equality are old slogans, but people, despite all the revolutions, do not become happier that”
Pierre is friendly with Prince Andrew. From the salon of Anna Pavlovna, he goes to visit his oldest friend. Andrew is frank with Pierre, says he is going to war “because this life, which I am leading here, this life is not for me.” With the appearance of the wife, his face becomes courteous, but indifferent. The accusations of his wife that he no longer loves her, only irritate Andrei. After the wife, bursting with tears, leaves them, Andrei says that his marriage was a mistake, convinces Pierre never to marry: “Never, never marry, my friend, here’s my advice, do not marry until you say so imagine that you have done all that you can, and until you stop loving the woman you chose until you see it clearly, otherwise you will be mistaken cruelly and irreparably. Marry an old man that is worthless… And then everything will be lost, that in you there is good and high. Everything will be spent on trifles… If you expect anything ahead of yourself, then at every step you will feel that everything is over for you, everything is closed, except for the living room, where you will stand on one board with the court footman and the idiot. .. My wife… one of those rare women with whom you can be deceased for your honor; but, my God, what would I not give now, so as not to be married! .. You say Bonaparte; but Bonaparte, when he worked, step by step went to his goal, he was free, he had nothing but his goal – and he reached it. But bind yourself to a woman – and, like a shackled pits, you lose all freedom. “Prince Andrew says that Pierre is dear to him, because” you are one living person in the midst of our whole world. “Andrei takes the word from Pierre,
Pierre reflects on the fact that the word given to them by Prince Andrey does not oblige anything, it will be much more fun to go on a drive to Anatoly. Dolokhov, Semyonov’s officer, a player and a brethren, Anatole’s friend, holds and wins with an Englishman that he drinks a bottle of rum, sitting on the windowsill, hanging his legs out the window and not holding on. Orderly drunk Pierre tries to repeat the “feat” of Dolokhov, but his friends dissuade him, along with Dolokhov, Pierre leaves to continue the spree.
Princess Drubetskaya returns to Moscow to her Rostov relatives. Mother and the youngest daughter are birthday girls. Drubetskaya tells the audience about the last scandal – Dolohov, Anatol Kuragin and Pierre, tied the bear and the quarter warder together, let them into the Moika (“the bear is swimming, the quarterly on it”). Dolokhov demoted to the soldiers, Pierre was deported from the city. With Anatole, the matter was hushed up thanks to the intervention of his father.
In the living room people talk about the fact that the old Count Bezukhov is dying, that his wife is the direct descendant of the whole estate, Prince Vasily, but his father loves Pierre, even though he is an illegitimate son, and probably will leave his whole estate or most of it to Pierre. Natasha comes running into the room with her black-eyed, ugly, but alive girl, with her child’s open shoulders, jumped out of her bodice from a fast run, with her black curls huddled back, thin bare hands and little legs in lace trousers and open shoes, was at that nice age, when the girl is no longer a child, and the child is not a girl yet. ” She tries to show her guest a doll, but Natasha is sent. There is also a young generation on behalf of the birthday: Boris is an officer, the son of Princess Anna Mikhailovna; Nikolai is a student, the eldest son of the Rostovs; Sonia is a fifteen-year-old niece of the Count, and Petrusha is the youngest son. In the living room the conversation continues, mention rumors about the war being prepared, again they recall Napoleon. Adults discuss the children’s affairs – Boris is going to the hussars, Natasha learns to sing from the Italian, who was specially hired for this, mention that she is in love with Boris. Natasha in the meantime hides among the tubers and flowers, hoping that she will be looking for Boris. Sonia enters the room, she is somewhat upset. She is jealous of Nicholas, he tries to disbelieve it in “fantasies”. When Nicholas and Sonya leave, Natasha summons Boris to her and invites him to kiss the doll. When he refuses, he offers to kiss her, then kisses it herself. Boris says that he is in love with her, but four more years will have to wait, and then he will ask for her hands. Guests in the meantime diverge. Tired Countess wants to talk with her old friend in private. They send the elder daughter Vera. Faith is beautiful, but cold and selfish. Passing by the sofa, she sees that two windows “symmetrically sat two pairs.” Faith is irritated, takes Nikolay’s inkwell, says that “in your years the secrets between Natasha and Boris and between you are all just silly.” Natasha responds that everyone has their own secrets and that they do not touch Vera and Berg (her fan). They swear, Vera slanders everyone with causticism, since, obviously, she is pleased. In the living room, meanwhile, the Countess of Rostov is questioning Anna Mikhailovna about her son Borenka, she is interested in whom she asked to see, since “your officer is a guard, and Nikolay is a cadet,” Anna Mikhailovna answers, that she asked Prince Vasily, who, she said, “was very nice, now agreed to everything and reported to the sovereign,” she said, completely forgetting all the humiliation she went through to achieve her goal. ” Anna Mikhailovna complained that her financial situation was lamentable, that if Count Bezukhov (Kirila Vladimirovich) did not want to support her godson, she would not even have anything to do with Boris. He says that Kirila Vladimirovich lives alone, that he has a huge fortune, and Borya is just beginning to live, and he has nothing, and this is unfair. She is going to go to Count Bezukhov to ask for Boris, Count Rostov asks to pass on to Pierre, so that on occasion he visits. Anna Mikhailovna tries to persuade her son to go with her to Count Bezukhov, he objects that nothing but humiliation will bring it. In the end, he agrees, and Drubetskie goes to Kiril Vladimirovich. In the living room they meet with Prince Vasily, who takes them rather coldly and unfairly. Drubetskaya with an odd participation is interested in the health of the sick Prince Kirilla Vladimirovich and thanks Prince Vasili for the assistance provided. According to Prince Vasily’s reaction, Drubetskaya understands that he sees Boris as an opponent in the struggle for the inheritance of Kirill Vladimirovich. Drubetskaya obsessively tries to make an appointment with the dying count. In the end, she reaches her goal, and Boris goes to Pierre, who is in the next room. Drubetskaya with an odd participation is interested in the health of the sick Prince Kirilla Vladimirovich and thanks Prince Vasili for the assistance provided. According to Prince Vasily’s reaction, Drubetskaya understands that he sees Boris as an opponent in the struggle for the inheritance of Kirill Vladimirovich. Drubetskaya obsessively tries to make an appointment with the dying count. In the end, she reaches her goal, and Boris goes to Pierre, who is in the next room. Drubetskaya with an odd participation is interested in the health of the sick Prince Kirilla Vladimirovich and thanks Prince Vasili for the assistance provided. According to Prince Vasily’s reaction, Drubetskaya understands that he sees Boris as an opponent in the struggle for the inheritance of Kirill Vladimirovich. Drubetskaya obsessively tries to make an appointment with the dying count. In the end, she reaches her goal, and Boris goes to Pierre, who is in the next room.
The story of Pierre’s antics (about the quarterly and the bear), which was told by the Rostovs, is the truth. The young Bezukhov was indeed deported from Petersburg to Moscow, but rumors of what had happened had already reached him. Three princesses in the house of his father – the daughter of Kirill Vladimirovich, met Pierre “as a dead man or plague.” At the request of a young man to see his father, he is refused (under the pretext of ill-health of the patient). Pierre has been staying upstairs for several days, waiting for the improvement of the count’s condition. Pierre does not remember Boris, but he, like his mother, is not at all embarrassed in this situation and appears to the interlocutor. Pierre tries to talk about politics, about Napoleon, but Boris answers that in Moscow society is more interested not in politics but in lunches, gossip, and in particular, to whom Count Bezukhov will leave his immense fortune. Boris is amused by the fact that all of the skin is climbing out to get anything from the rich man, and he hastily adds that they are not among the compulsive petitioners with the mother, and assures that even if he were offered something, he would not have taken it. Pierre rushes to shake Boris’s hand, invites him to come to the Rostovs, where they can meet again and get to know each other better.
Meanwhile, the princess leaves the Count’s chambers. He is so bad that he almost does not recognize anyone. Anna Mikhailovna declares that she will come to spend the night. Boris is interested in the Count’s attitude to Pierre, to which the mother responds: “Everyone will tell a will, from him our destiny depends.” When asked by her son why she decided that the Count would leave something for them, Anna Mikhailovna answered: “He is so rich, and we are so poor.” The son skeptically notes that this is still an insufficient reason, but the mother does not listen to him.
The Countess of Rostov asks her husband for money. He gives, despite the fact that the Rostovs do not have too much free money. When Drubetskaya returns to the Rostovs from Count Bezukhov, the Countess of Rostov gives this money to her – “Boris, for sewing a uniform.” Meanwhile Lieutenant Berg, an “officer of the Semenov regiment, with whom Boris rode together to the regiment and to whom Natasha was teasing Vera, is sitting in the office of Count Rostov.” Berg discusses the advantages of infantry before the cavalry: “If I were in cavalry, I would receive no more than two hundred rubles… even in the rank of lieutenant, and now I get two hundred and thirty…” Berg always speaks only about himself, and all his thoughts are occupied solely by one’s own person. Above Berg tease, the Earl laughs, but Berg does not notice ridicule. The Rostovs have a dinner party, where Pierre also comes. He is embarrassed, he is embarrassed, says little, eats a lot at dinner. “Natasha, who was sitting opposite him, looked at Boris as the girls of thirteen looked at the boy with whom they had just kissed and to whom they were in love.” This same look sometimes appealed to Pierre, and to him, under the gaze of this ridiculous, the lively girl wanted to laugh herself, not knowing what. ” At dinner at the men’s end of the table they talk about politics, and the ladies are busy with their conversations. Natasha is mischievous and behaves quite boldly. After dinner, guests sit down to play cards, and some of them play the clavichord and harp. Natasha notices that Sonya is nowhere to be found, and runs to look for her. Crying Sonya appears on the trunk of the corridor: “Nicholas in two weeks goes to the army.” Sonya shows Natasha poems written by Nikolai’s hand, says that after dinner she spoke with Vera, who, noticing these poems, scolded Sonya, called her ungrateful and assured her that her mother would never allow Nicholas to marry Sonya, and he married Julie Karagina. Sonya is jealous of Nicholas to the rival, Natasha is trying to reassure her. Suddenly Natasha remembers: “And you know… this fat Pierre, that was sitting against me, so funny… I’m very happy.” Natasha returns to the hall and, going up to Pierre, says that her mother asked her to dance with Pierre. Pierre dances with Natasha, meanwhile Count Rostov with Marya Dmitrievna Akhrosimova show how they danced in their years – dance an incendiary dance.
While the Rostovs are having a holiday, with Count Bezukhov, the sixth blow happens. Even the commander-in-chief of Moscow himself came to see him and spent about half an hour alone with the patient. The German doctor claims that the earl will die tonight. Prince Vasily goes to his niece, Princess Katerina, and says that it is necessary to think about their future and about the future of the family of Prince Vasily himself. He tries to find out why the Earl demanded to Pierre, recalls that last winter the Earl wrote a will, in which he left most of his fortune to Pierre. Princess does not believe, since Pierre is an illegitimate son. But Prince Vasilii objected that the Count could write a letter to the Tsar asking for the adoption of Pierre-moreover, the Count did indeed write such a letter, but it is not known whether he sent it or not. If the request is granted, then Pierre is the only legitimate heir to wealth, and the remaining “pretenders” will not get anything. Princess stubbornly stands on her own and refuses to believe. Prince Vasily reports that the lawyer confirms his information. Then the princess begins to reproach the dying count in baseness, black ingratitude, etc., accuses acquaintances, including Anna Mikhailovna, that she uttered nasty things to the Count, and he wrote such a will. Meanwhile, Prince Vasily learns that the will lies in the mosaic portfolio, which the old count keeps under the pillow. accuses acquaintances, including Anna Mikhailovna, that she uttered nasty things to the Count, and he wrote such a will. In the meantime, Prince Vasilii learns that the will lies in the mosaic portfolio that the old count holds under the pillow. accuses acquaintances, including Anna Mikhailovna, that she uttered nasty things to the Count, and he wrote such a will. In the meantime, Prince Vasilii learns that the will lies in the mosaic portfolio that the old count holds under the pillow.
In the house of the dying Count Bezukhov come Pierre and Anna Mikhailovna. Passing by one of the rooms, they accidentally see Prince Vasili talking to the princess there. Prince Vasily makes a frightened face, the princess jumps up and slams the door with a noise. Pierre does not understand what’s going on, unlike Anna Mikhailovna, who seems to have expected something like this. Pierre is invited to a dying father. In the room there are three princesses, the eldest of whom with difficulty restrain anger. The Count is confided by the priest. Pierre’s meeting with his father lasts no more than two minutes: the count is unable to speak and, realizing his weakness, tries to smile: Then everyone leaves the room. After a while (when they should serve tea), Pierre notices that Anna Mikhailovna does not let the elder princess into the Count’s rooms, although she persistently tries to penetrate there. However, the princess already holds a mosaic briefcase and says she does not know “what’s in that paper”, which is in the briefcase: “I only know that the present testament is in his office, and this is a forgotten paper.” But Anna Mikhailovna grabs the briefcase and does not let the princess pass. Both women silently try to snatch the briefcase from each other. Anna Mikhailovna calls Pierre, Prince Vasili, who is here, comes to himself and tells the princess to let go of the briefcase. But she, not remembering herself and shouting “The intriguer!”, Snatches the portfolio from Drubetskaya and tries to escape. The middle princess who enters her introduces her. Anna Mikhailovna quickly raises the briefcase that fell out of the hands of the senior princess. They are informed that the count died. The elder Princess throws Pierre in the face of the accusation that he was just waiting for it. “I know only that the present testament is in his office, and this is a forgotten paper.” But Anna Mikhailovna grabs the briefcase and does not let the princess go through. Both women silently try to snatch the briefcase from each other Anna Mikhailovna calls Pierre, Prince Vasily, who is here, comes to himself and orders the princess to release her briefcase, but she, without remembering herself and shouting “Intriguer!”, Snatches the portfolio from Drubetskaya and tries to escape. Anna Mikhailovna quickly raises you the briefcase fallen from the hands of the senior princess, they are informed that the count died, and the elder princess throws Pierre in the face of the accusation that he was the only one who was waiting for it. “I know only that the present testament is in his office, and this is a forgotten paper.” But Anna Mikhailovna grabs the briefcase and does not let the princess go through. Both women silently try to snatch the briefcase from each other Anna Mikhailovna calls Pierre, Prince Vasily, who is here, comes to himself and orders the princess to release her briefcase, but she, without remembering herself and shouting “Intriguer!”, Snatches the portfolio from Drubetskaya and tries to escape. Anna Mikhailovna quickly raises you the briefcase fallen from the hands of the senior princess, they are informed that the count died, and the elder princess throws Pierre in the face of the accusation that he was the only one who was waiting for it. but it’s a forgotten paper. “But Anna Mikhailovna grabs the briefcase and does not let the princess pass, but Anna Mikhailovna calls Pierre, Prince Vasily, who is there, and comes to his senses and tells the princess to let go of the briefcase. But she, not remembering herself and screaming “The intriguer!”, Snatches the portfolio from Drubetskaya and tries to escape. The incoming middle princess makes her understand. Anna Mikhailovna quickly raises the briefcase that fell out of the hands of the senior princess, they are informed that the count died. The elder princess is thrown by Pierre in the face of the accusation that he was just waiting for this. but it’s a forgotten paper. “But Anna Mikhailovna grabs the briefcase and does not let the princess pass, but Anna Mikhailovna calls Pierre, Prince Vasily, who is there, and comes to his senses and tells the princess to let go of the briefcase. But she, not remembering herself and screaming “The intriguer!”, Snatches the portfolio from Drubetskaya and tries to escape. The incoming middle princess makes her understand. Anna Mikhailovna quickly raises the briefcase that fell out of the hands of the senior princess, they are informed that the count died. The elder princess is thrown by Pierre in the face of the accusation that he was just waiting for this. comes to himself and tells the princess to let go of the briefcase. But she, not remembering herself and shouting “The intriguer!”, Snatches the portfolio from Drubetskaya and tries to escape. The middle princess who enters her introduces her. Anna Mikhailovna quickly raises the briefcase that fell out of the hands of the senior princess. They are informed that the count died. The elder Princess throws Pierre in the face of the accusation that he was just waiting for it. comes to himself and tells the princess to let go of the briefcase. But she, not remembering herself and shouting “The intriguer!”, Snatches the portfolio from Drubetskaya and tries to escape. The middle princess who enters her introduces her. Anna Mikhailovna quickly raises the briefcase that fell out of the hands of the senior princess. They are informed that the count died. The elder Princess throws Pierre in the face of the accusation that he was just waiting for it.
In the Bald Mountains, in the estate of Prince Nikolai Andreevich Bolkonsky, they await the arrival of the young prince and the princess. In the estate live: the prince Bolkonsky (Andrei Bolkonsky’s father) and his daughter Marya, Andrei’s sister. The old prince personally engaged in the upbringing of his daughter and worked all his life, “he did something, wrote memoirs, he sorted out the calculations from higher mathematics, then sharpened the snuffbox on the machine tool, or worked in the garden…” Despite the fact that the prince left in resignation, the Governor himself from time to time is to him and waits for “the hour of reception.” The prince is marked by sharp judgments and is known as a tough person. He deals with his daughter geometry, while often losing his temper, hurling notebooks, scolding his student. Princess Mary receives a letter from Julie Karagina, in which she describes the latest news: about the approaching war, about Nikolay Rostov, who entered the regiment, about the death of the old Count Bezukhov, who left his legacy to his illegitimate son, Pierre, who, however, was now recognized as legitimate. Thus, Pierre is the owner of a huge fortune, perhaps the largest in Russia, and therefore, an enviable groom. Julie also tells her friend that Anna Mikhailovna, this “universal aunt”, is trying to arrange the marriage of Anatole, the son of Prince Vasily, with Mary, to whom the choice has fallen because “they want to attach him by marrying a rich and noble maiden.” In the reply letter, Marya wrote to Julie that she was sorry for everyone-both Pierre and Prince Vasili, who, according to rumors, played a very unseemly role in this whole story, notes that everything should be treated in a Christian way, take an example from God’s people and other. who left his legacy to his illegitimate son, Pierre, recognized, however, now legitimate. Thus, Pierre is the owner of a huge fortune, perhaps the largest in Russia, and therefore, an enviable groom. Julie also tells her friend that Anna Mikhailovna, this “universal aunt”, is trying to arrange the marriage of Anatole, the son of Prince Vasily, with Mary, to whom the choice has fallen because “they want to attach him by marrying a rich and noble maiden.” In the reply letter, Marya wrote to Julie that she was sorry for everyone-both Pierre and Prince Vasili, who, according to rumors, played a very unseemly role in this whole story, notes that everything should be treated in a Christian way, take an example from God’s people and other. who left his legacy to his illegitimate son, Pierre, recognized, however, now legitimate. Thus, Pierre is the owner of a huge fortune, perhaps the largest in Russia, and therefore, an enviable groom. Julie also tells her friend that Anna Mikhailovna, this “universal aunt”, is trying to arrange the marriage of Anatole, the son of Prince Vasily, with Mary, to whom the choice has fallen because “they want to attach him by marrying a rich and noble maiden.” In the reply letter, Marya wrote to Julie that she was sorry for everyone-both Pierre and Prince Vasili, who, according to rumors, played a very unseemly role in this whole story, notes that everything should be treated in a Christian way, take an example from God’s people and other. Pierre is the owner of a huge fortune, perhaps the largest in Russia, and therefore, an enviable groom. Julie also tells her friend that Anna Mikhailovna, this “universal aunt”, is trying to arrange the marriage of Anatole, the son of Prince Vasily, with Mary, to whom the choice has fallen because “they want to attach him by marrying a rich and noble maiden.” In the reply letter, Marya wrote to Julie that she was sorry for everyone-both Pierre and Prince Vasili, who, according to rumors, played a very unseemly role in this whole story, notes that everything should be treated in a Christian way, take an example from God’s people and other. Pierre is the owner of a huge fortune, perhaps the largest in Russia, and therefore, an enviable groom. Julie also tells her friend that Anna Mikhailovna, this “universal aunt”, is trying to arrange the marriage of Anatole, the son of Prince Vasily, with Mary, to whom the choice has fallen because “they want to attach him by marrying a rich and noble maiden.” In the reply letter, Marya wrote to Julie that she was sorry for everyone-both Pierre and Prince Vasili, who, according to rumors, played a very unseemly role in this whole story, notes that everything should be treated in a Christian way, take an example from God’s people and other. on which the choice fell because “they want to attach it, marrying a rich and noble maiden.” In the reply letter, Marya wrote to Julie that she was sorry for everyone-both Pierre and Prince Vasili, who, according to rumors, played a very unseemly role in this whole story, notes that everything should be treated in a Christian way, take an example from God’s people and other. on which the choice fell because “they want to attach it, marrying a rich and noble maiden.” In the reply letter, Marya wrote to Julie that she was sorry for everyone-both Pierre and Prince Vasili, who, according to rumors, played a very unseemly role in this whole story, notes that everything should be treated in a Christian way, take an example from God’s people and other.
After some time Prince Andrew comes to the estate with his wife. Women exchange the latest news, and among other things Mary learns that Andrew goes to war. The old prince, even in honor of the arrival of his son, does not change his daily routine – he takes certain hours for a meeting with Andrei. Father and son talk about politics and the coming war. Prince Andrew goes around the estate, he recognizes the rooms in which he grew up, familiar things from childhood. At dinner, the conversation about politics and about Napoleon resumed. When it comes to Suvorov and Prince Andrey tries to doubt that Suvorov displayed his genius and talent in all battles, his father is losing his temper and declares that “no Bonaparte” with Suvorov can be compared. Prince Andrew draws attention to the fact that the French have a good army, excellent soldiers, but nevertheless, in order to parse all the errors of Napoleon. The father notices that he understands political perspectives and “does not sleep nights himself”.
In the evening of the next day, Prince Andrew leaves. Before parting, Princess Mary goes to her brother and asks him to be more kind to his wife, who, she says, is “a perfect child, such a sweet, cheerful child.” She reminds Andrei that his wife has become accustomed to being in the world and now it will be hard for her to stay in the village without her husband and the society to which she is accustomed. Marya also notes that the young princess liked Mademoiselle Bourien, the companion of Princess Mary. Prince Andrew does not share the views of his sister. He says that Marya, apparently, lives unhappily with her father – he always had a cool character. Princess Mary in particular does not understand the father’s attitude toward religion – an extremely negative relationship. She says that she tried to influence her father – she brought a monk to visit and so on. At parting Princess Mary gives his brother the old image of the Savior with a black face in a silver robe and asks Andrew never to take it off – “his grandfather still wore in all wars.” Although Andrei treats gifts of this kind with skepticism, but still gratefully accepts the image and even kisses it. Finally, Prince Andrew confesses to his sister that he is unhappy in his family life and that his wife is also unhappy, although neither she nor herself can be reproached for anything in relation to her. Prince Andrew says goodbye to his father, he praises his son for the fact that “for a woman’s skirt” does not hold: “Service first.” Andrew asks his father to send to Moscow for an obstetrician, when his wife begins labor, reports that his wife has seen some bad dream and now is afraid to give birth. The father understands the son in everything, understands that Andrew is unhappy in marriage, consoles him by the fact that “women are all like that,” but promises to do everything as befits. The old prince writes a letter to Kutuzov asking him to appoint Andrei “to a good place… and not to keep an adjutant for a long time” and gives the letter to his son. Then the old Bolkonsky says that, most likely, he will die before his son, and asks after his death to transmit “notes” (memoirs) to the emperor. He gives Andrei Lombard ticket and a letter – “this is an award to someone who will write the history of the Suvorov wars.” At parting, he punishes his son to behave “as befits.” Andrei asks his father in case of his death, “if a boy is born, do not let him go and educate him personally.” Saying goodbye to Andrew, his wife falls unconscious. Prince Andrew is leaving. The old prince writes a letter to Kutuzov asking him to appoint Andrei “to a good place… and not to keep an adjutant for a long time” and gives the letter to his son. Then the old Bolkonsky says that, most likely, he will die before his son, and asks after his death to transmit “notes” (memoirs) to the emperor. He gives Andrei Lombard ticket and a letter – “this is an award to someone who will write the history of the Suvorov wars.” At parting, he punishes his son to behave “as befits.” Andrei asks his father in case of his death, “if a boy is born, do not let him go and educate him personally.” Saying goodbye to Andrew, his wife falls unconscious. Prince Andrew is leaving. The old prince writes a letter to Kutuzov asking him to appoint Andrei “to a good place… and not to keep an adjutant for a long time” and gives the letter to his son. Then the old Bolkonsky says that, most likely, he will die before his son, and asks after his death to transmit “notes” (memoirs) to the emperor. He gives Andrei Lombard ticket and a letter – “this is an award to someone who will write the history of the Suvorov wars.” At parting, he punishes his son to behave “as befits.” Andrei asks his father in case of his death, “if a boy is born, do not let him go and educate him personally.” Saying goodbye to Andrew, his wife falls unconscious. Prince Andrew is leaving. and asks after his death to transmit “notes” (memoirs) to the emperor. He gives Andrei Lombard ticket and a letter – “this is an award to someone who will write the history of the Suvorov wars.” At parting, he punishes his son to behave “as befits.” Andrei asks his father in case of his death, “if a boy is born, do not let him go and educate him personally.” Saying goodbye to Andrew, his wife falls unconscious. Prince Andrew is leaving. and asks after his death to transmit “notes” (memoirs) to the emperor. He gives Andrei Lombard ticket and a letter – “this is an award to someone who will write the history of the Suvorov wars.” At parting, he punishes his son to behave “as befits.” Andrei asks his father in case of his death, “if a boy is born, do not let him go and educate him personally.” Saying goodbye to Andrew, his wife falls unconscious. Prince Andrew is leaving. his wife falls unconscious. Prince Andrew is leaving. his wife falls unconscious. Prince Andrew is leaving.

October 1805 year. Russian troops occupy the cities and villages of the archduke of Austria, go to join with the allies. Before that, the soldiers made a 30-mile crossing, but, since the arrival of the commander-in-chief is expected, the authorities demand that they dress uniforms, march, etc. Kutuzov arrives, arranges a review of the troops, recognizes some of the junior officers in person. In the retinue of Kutuzov – Prince Andrew. When they reach the third company, Prince Andrew tells Kutuzov that he asked to recall the degraded Dolokhov, who serves in this regiment. Kutuzov is summoned by Dolokhov, who asks for an opportunity to redeem his guilt, prove loyalty to the emperor and Russia. The soldiers again go to the march, talk about Kutuzov, call him “father.” After the review Kutuzov comes to the headquarters. He mockingly reads the letter of the Archduke about the successful advance of the latter’s troops. Then Kutuzov asks Prince Andrew to show the Austrian general of the report of Russian spies present here and other materials reflecting the real state of affairs. “Despite the fact that a little more time has passed since Prince Andrew left Russia, he changed a lot during this time.” In the expression on his face, in his movements, in his walk, there was almost no previous pretense, fatigue and laziness, he had a kind of person who does not have time to think about the impression he makes on others, and busy with the business pleasant and interesting. ” Kutuzov refers to Bolkonsky better than to other adjutants: “he took with him to Vienna and gave more serious instructions.” Kutuzov wrote to Andrei’s father a letter with praise for the young prince. The comrades have different attitudes towards Andrei: some of them note his outstanding abilities and expect him to make significant progress in his career; most of them consider him an inflated, cold and unpleasant person.
The news is expected from the commander of the Austrian army, Mack. At this time, a general unexpectedly arrives at the headquarters, whom the adjutants do not want to miss Kutuzov. The commander-in-chief goes into the waiting room and finds out in the arrived general Maka. The Austrians are defeated near Ulm, almost the whole army surrendered. Prince Andrew understands that the Russian army, thus, is in a very difficult situation, that it will have a difficult battle with the French. On the one hand, he is happy about this, because at last he will enter the battle, on the other hand he is afraid, because he knows a lot of the strengths of Bonaparte as a commander. One of the adjutants, a certain Zharkov, congratulates Mak with a mockery. Prince Bolkonsky sharply pulls back Zharkov: “We are officers or officers who serve our tsar and the Fatherland and rejoice in our common success and we are sad about the general failure, or we are footmen, who do not care about the master’s business. “Junker Rostov serves in a squadron under the command of captain Denisov, the famous” whole cavalry division under the name of Vaska Denisov. “Rostov lives with the commander. In the morning Denisov returns in a bad mood, as he lost in the dust, says: “Hurry up and fight.” They are approached by an officer Telyanin, whom they did not like for being secretive and self-interested in the regiment. “Stepping around the room, he leaves.” Denisov sits down to write a letter to a girl who recently got carried away, at this time the sergeant-sergeant but money, Rostov suggests Denisov to borrow money from him, but Denisov tells him to give him a purse and discovers that the purse has disappeared (usually he was lying under the pillow). Rostov understands that Telyanin took the money, goes to his apartment, finds out, that he went to the headquarters, and leaves after him. Rostov finds Telyanin at dinner in a tavern. After waiting a while (until Telyanina came to pay the price), Nikolai sees how he pulls Denisov’s purse out of his pocket and takes out the gold from there. Rostov accuses Telyanin of stealing, he is frightened, asks “not to ruin” him, tells a pitiful story about his old parents, begs Rostov not to publicize the matter. Rostov with disgust throws his wallet with the words: “If you need, take this money.” Then, in the company of officers, the conversation goes about Telyanin, and Rostov tells that he stole the money. The regimental commander upsets Nicholas, accusing him of lying, and Rostov calls him to a duel. Friends, including Denisov, are trying to dissuade Rostov from the duel, they are advised to apologize to the regimental commander. Despite their reasonable arguments, the young man refuses. Telyanin meanwhile affected the patient: the next day he was ordered to “exclude”. Zharkov enters the room and reports that General Mack and the entire Austrian army surrendered. Denisov and the others are happy that it’s time to “campaign”.
Soon the Russian army enters into battle. It should describe the crossing, which is fired from afar by the French. Soldiers joke, express their opinions about what is happening. Denisov is preparing a squadron for battle. Rostov “had a happy appearance of the student, called before the big public to the exam, in which he is sure that he will be different.” Russian troops withdraw. Denisov asks the commander to allow him to attack. In a complete mess, the bridge is not set on fire in time, and the hussars are ordered to do so when the enemy is already bringing the guns to the distance of the shot. Rostov also appears on the bridge among the other hussars, although he does not have a bundle to set fire to, nor a stretcher. He does not understand what is happening around: the enemy, who should be hacked, no, and around the people are falling. However, as it turns out later, no one notices his confusion, on the contrary, everyone congratulates him on combat baptism. The regiment commander, the German Bogdanych, whose fault was not set on fire in time, said that during the operation he lost a “trifle” – two hussars were injured and one was “on the spot”.
Kutuzov crosses the Danube and stops. On the thirtieth of October he attacks the Mortier division and smashes the enemy. During the battle for the first time, trophies – a banner, guns and two enemy generals are taken. In battle, Prince Andrew was wounded horse, and he himself was slightly scraped by a bullet in his hand. As a sign of special mercy Bolkonsky sent to the Austrian court with the news of the last victory. Met on the road with the wounded soldiers, Prince Andrew learns that they suffered during this victorious battle, and gives them all three gold.
The Austrian military minister and his adjutant greet the Russian courier coldly, by their behavior making it clear that Kutuzov’s military actions do not bother them at all. Of all the reports, the minister only draws attention to the fact that Mortier himself was not taken and his compatriot Schmidt was killed, which, in his opinion, is “too expensive to pay for the victory.” Leaving the palace, Prince Andrew feels that the joy that filled him after the victory, disappeared. He meets an old acquaintance – Russian diplomat Bilibin, tells him about what happened, he answers that such a relationship should be expected. If Bolkonsky brought news of the victory of Archduke Charles or Ferdinand “even over a company of the Bonaparte fire brigade, this is another matter, we will be dumped into guns, but when it comes to a completely different turn – Mack is losing an entire army, Karl and Ferdinand make a mistake after the mistake, one Kutuzov is winning, – the irritation of the Austrians is quite understandable. “Prince Andrew admires Napoleon:” What happiness for this man, what genius! “Bilibin shares his views on the likely course of future events: Austria remained in a fool and now, most likely, he will seek a secret peace with France, Bolkonsky does not believe, says that “it would be too disgusting.” The next day Bilibin gathers guests. Prince Andrey meets Ippolit Kuragin (Prince Vasily’s son) and remarks that the man to whom he was almost jealous of his wife, plays the role of buffoon in this society. The importance with which he speaks nonsense about politics amuses those present. Prince Andrew admires Napoleon: “What happiness for this man, what a genius!” Bilibin shares his thoughts on the likely course of future events: Austria has remained in a fool and now, most likely, will seek a secret peace with France. Bolkonsky does not believe, says that “it would be too disgusting.” The next day Bilibin gathers guests. Prince Andrew meets Ippolit Kuragin (Prince Vasily’s son) and notices that the man to whom he was almost jealous of his wife in this society plays the role of jester. The importance with which he speaks nonsense about politics, amuses those present. Prince Andrew admires Napoleon: “What happiness for this man, what a genius!” Bilibin shares his thoughts on the likely course of future events: Austria has remained in a fool and now, most likely, will seek a secret peace with France. Bolkonsky does not believe, says that “it would be too disgusting.” The next day Bilibin gathers guests. Prince Andrew meets Ippolit Kuragin (Prince Vasily’s son) and notices that the man to whom he was almost jealous of his wife in this society plays the role of jester. The importance with which he speaks nonsense about politics, amuses those present. will seek a secret peace with France. Bolkonsky does not believe, says that “it would be too disgusting.” The next day Bilibin gathers guests. Prince Andrew meets Ippolit Kuragin (Prince Vasily’s son) and notices that the man to whom he was almost jealous of his wife in this society plays the role of jester. The importance with which he speaks nonsense about politics, amuses those present. will seek a secret peace with France. Bolkonsky does not believe, says that “it would be too disgusting.” The next day Bilibin gathers guests. Prince Andrew meets Ippolit Kuragin (Prince Vasily’s son) and notices that the man to whom he was almost jealous of his wife in this society plays the role of jester. The importance with which he speaks nonsense about politics, amuses those present.
The next day Bolkonsky goes to see the Emperor Franz with the news of the battle he won. The emperor asks him several meaningless questions (about the time of the beginning of the battle, about the distance from one village to another, etc.). However, in spite of Bilibin’s prophecies, in general at the court, the news of Kutuzov’s victory is greeted joyfully and Prince Andrew is even awarded the Order of Maria Theresa of the third degree. The Emperor orders a solemn public prayer. Bilibin suddenly appears and reports that the French army crossed one of the bridges defended by the Austrians, and although the bridge was mined, it was for some reason not blown up, which, it seems, even Bonaparte was surprised. This means that after a while the French will enter the city. Everyone rushes to pack things to run. The Russian army was in an even more difficult position, because now the French will almost certainly cut it off. Despite the sad news, Prince Andrew perceives what happened with inner enthusiasm – for some reason it seems to him that it is he who can lead the army out of a predicament – “here he is, that Toulon, who will lead him out of the ranks of unknown officers and open me the first path to glory “. Bilibin retells the story with an unexploded bridge – the behavior of the Austrian general borders on betrayal. Prince Andrew decides to immediately leave again, although he intended to stay in the city for another two days. Bilibin advises him not to return to the army, which is in a hopeless state, and retreat with him. Bolkonsky refuses. Along the way, Prince Andrew looks with contempt at the retreating army, on carts and soldiers drowning in the mud. On the way, he sees a cart, in which a woman who calls herself the wife of the doctor of the Seventh Jäger Regiment sits, is wiped aside. The woman turns to the prince for help, but when he demands to pass the cart, a drunken officer yells at him. Prince Andrew is furious, the officer is frightened and misses the wagon. Everything that happens around seems to Bolkonsky to be disgusting. He returns to the headquarters, where before his eyes Kutuzov sends Bagration “to a great feat” – Bagration should detain the French, and give the Russian army the opportunity to take a more advantageous position. Prince Andrew asks permission to join Bagration, but Kutuzov does not let him go. Bagration sends parliamentarians to the French to negotiate a truce in order to gain time. Murat falls for this bait, but Bonaparte, having received a message from Murat, immediately understands that the negotiations are “false”, “
Prince Andrew still wants Kutuzov to send him to Bagration. Together with the staff officer they bypass the tents and in one of them they find several officers who sit at the tables and have dinner. One of them “was without boots… a small, dirty, thin artillery officer.” This is Captain Tushin. The staff officer makes Tushin reprimand, but the Bolkonsky captain likes it. In the artilleryman’s figure “there was something special, completely non-military, somewhat comic, but extremely attractive.” Prince Andrew goes around the troops, watching preparations for the battle. The soldiers are cheerful; everywhere there is a life: someone takes a sample from the preparing dinner, somewhere a soldier is punished, robbing a friend. One of the soldiers mimics the French, distorting Russian words, the rest laugh. Laughter along the chain spreads over the French army. It seems to Prince Andrew that, in the next moment, everyone will “discharge their guns and go home”. But this does not happen: the guns are loaded and ready for battle. Tolstoy in the novel addresses several times the theme of the meaninglessness of the war and says that if simple soldiers did not want to fight, but went home, then the war would not take place. Passing by the battery of Tushin, Prince Andrew hears the captain talking to someone about the future life, about the immortality of the soul: “If it were possible to know what will happen after death, then no one would be afraid of death from us.” that if ordinary soldiers did not want to fight, but went home, then the war would not have taken place. Passing by the battery of Tushin, Prince Andrew hears the captain talking to someone about the future life, about the immortality of the soul: “If it were possible to know what will happen after death, then no one would be afraid of death from us.” that if ordinary soldiers did not want to fight, but went home, then the war would not have taken place. Passing by the battery of Tushin, Prince Andrew hears the captain talking to someone about the future life, about the immortality of the soul: “If it were possible to know what will happen after death, then no one would be afraid of death from us.”
The battle begins. Prince Andrew embraces excitement. He tries to understand what “his Toulon” will be expressed in. Together with Bagration and several officers Bolkonsky goes to the battery of Tushin. On the way, Prince Andrew noticed a sword in Bagration, which Suvorov had given him in Italy. Tushin fires in the village of Shengraben, on which no one ordered him to shoot, but he himself, “after consulting with his sergeant-major Zakharchenk,” took such a decision. Bagration approves of Tushin’s actions. “Prince Andrew carefully listened to the conversations of Prince Bagration with the chiefs and to the orders given to them, and to surprise he noticed that there were no orders to be given, and that Prince Bagration was only trying to pretend that everything that was done by necessity, accident and the will of private chiefs, that all this was done at least not at his command, but according to his intentions. Thanks to the tact that Prince Bagration showed, Prince Andrew noticed that, in spite of this accident of events and their independence from the will of the chief, his presence had done extremely much. The chiefs, who were approaching Prince Bagration’s with frustrated faces, became calm, the soldiers and officers cheerfully greeted him and grew lively in his presence and evidently flaunted their bravery before him. “During the detour, Prince Andrew noted with surprise that everything was going on at all not so, as taught and said in theory. The soldiers are knocked into a pile, but nevertheless they reflect the attack behind the attack. The French are coming nearer, another attack is preparing. Bagration personally leads the soldiers into battle and overturns the enemy. Ray Tushino village lights. This, as well as the successful actions of the soldiers of Bagration allow the Russian army to retreat. The squadron, where Rostov serves, is stopped facing the enemy. Nobody says anything definite, it feels that the bosses themselves do not know what to do. Indecision of the command is reported to the troops. Rostov and other hussars jump into the attack. A horse is being killed near Nicholas. Around everything mixed up, he does not understand where the Russians are, where the French are. When Rostov rises to his feet, he discovers that he is surrounded by the enemy. “The front Frenchman, with a hunchbacked nose, ran so close that he could already see the expression on his face, and the heated, strange face of this man, who with a bayonet at the ready, holding his breath, ran lightly to him, frightened Rostov.” He grabbed the gun and, to shoot it,
Dolokhov during the battle is different and reminds the regimental commander that he captured a French officer, and also captured two trophies – a French sword and a bag. In addition, he managed to stop the errantly fleeing company, later received a bayonet wound.
In the turmoil about the battery, Tushin was completely forgotten, and only at the end of the retreat did Bagration send the staff officer and then Prince Andrey to send Tushin the order to retreat. Despite the heavy losses, Tushin’s battery continues to fire, Tushin himself orders: with a pipe in his mouth, he runs to the guns, then checks the charges. It seems that he is in a delirium: he is twice ordered to retreat, but the captain does not hear. Prince Andrew helps to harness the horses in four surviving guns and retreats along with the battery. As soon as Tushin emerges from the fire and descends into the ravine, he is greeted by his superiors and adjutants, “including the headquarters officer, and Zharkov, twice sent and never reached Tushin’s battery.” All of them, interrupting each other, give orders, abuse Tushin. He is silent, afraid to protest. Tushin leaves, a wounded Junker approaches the cannon and asks “for God’s sake” to put him on the gun carriage. This is Rostov. Tushin fulfills his request. Soon the battery stops for a rest. It’s getting dark. Rostov can not find his part, Tushin is summoned to the general. The officers at the headquarters examine the captured French banner. The regimental commander tells fictional stories, reminds Bagration about the degraded Dolokhov. The staff officer reports on the arrival of Tushin, from whom “they almost collided” with Prince Andrey. Bolkonsky sharply replies that he had no pleasure in catching the staff officer on the battery. Bagration pronounces Tushin for the fact that he left a gun on the battlefield that he could be taken using a cover. Tushin does not say that there was really no cover, because he “is afraid to bring another commander”. However, Prince Andrew describes Bagration’s real state of affairs at the time of the battle – the abandoned gun was broken, and the successful completion of the day’s operation the army is primarily due to the actions of Tushin’s battery, which, incidentally, no one covered. Bolkonsky feels deep disappointment about what is happening, noting that everything is completely different than he had expected. Rostov sits in the dark, – not knowing what is happening around him, – his hand is very painful. He feels himself lonely and abandoned, unnecessary, remembers the life of the house, where he was “strong, cheerful, beloved.” Bolkonsky feels deep disappointment about what is happening, noting that everything is completely different than he had expected. Rostov sits in the dark, – not knowing what is happening around him, – his hand is very painful. He feels himself lonely and abandoned, unnecessary, remembers the life of the house, where he was “strong, cheerful, beloved.” Bolkonsky feels deep disappointment about what is happening, noting that everything is completely different than he had expected. Rostov sits in the dark, – not knowing what is happening around him, – his hand is very painful. He feels himself lonely and abandoned, unnecessary, remembers the life of the house, where he was “strong, cheerful, beloved.”

Prince Vasily never thinks about his plans, but instinctively feels with which person for the sake of profit is close, who to flatter, etc. He decides to extradite his daughter Helen for the wealthy Pierre Bezukhov, and at the same time improve his financial affairs and take the forty thousand he needs. Prince Vasili arranges for Pierre an appointment to the junker chambers (which is equivalent to the rank of state councilor) and insists that the young man with him go to Petersburg and stay at his house. Pierre feels that the attitude of others around him after receiving a huge inheritance has changed: everyone has become extremely courteous, affectionate, and so on. Even the elder princess (who was arguing with Pierre because of the mosaic portfolio) apologizes for her unworthy behavior. Pierre writes out a bill of thirty thousand in her name, and the princess becomes even more affable and even starts to knit for Pierre a striped scarf. Pierre naively believes in the favor of others, especially since deep down he considers himself to be full of all virtues, which, in his opinion, finally, everyone appreciated. Gradually Prince Vasily completely “tidies up” Pierre to his hands, forcing him to sign the papers he needs. All former friends of the young Bezukhov had parted ways: Dolohov was demoted, Anatol in the army, Prince Andrew abroad. His free time Pierre now holds at dinners, balls and Prince Vasily. Even Anna Pavlovna Scherer changed her attitude towards Pierre. Previously, he felt uncomfortable, felt that his judgments were indecent and tactless, but now any of his words are met favorably, if not with delight. Anna Pavlovna and others begin to hint to Pierre about marriage to Helen. On the one hand, it frightens the young man, but on the other – like, because Helen is beautiful. On one of the evenings, Anna Pavlovna began talking with Pierre about Helen, in every way praising the latter. Hints become too obvious, and Pierre is forced to take a slightly different look at Helen. He pays attention to her figure, looks at her bare shoulders and feels how desire in him lights up. He recalls thousands of hints of Prince Vasily and other acquaintances, and suddenly he is horrified – did he already bind himself with any obligations or promises. After some time, Prince Vasily is going to leave for revision in four provinces. Before leaving, he decides that it’s time to put an end to Bezukhov’s marriage. He is genuinely surprised that Pierre, who “owes so much to him”, behaves towards Helen a little dishonorably (that is, does not make offers). Prince Vasily decides that at the first opportunity he will finish this tedious business. A handy case soon appears – named after Helen. After the evening, Scherer passed a month and a half, and despite Pierre’s assurance that the marriage with Helen would be a disaster for him and that he needed to escape from her as quickly as possible, he did not move from Prince Vasili. Pierre, with horror, realizes that he is increasingly perceived by society as the bridegroom of Helen, that “he can not tear himself away from her” and that in the end “he is obliged to associate his fate with her.” He is surprised to find that he lacks the determination to break this relationship, although the determination has always been there. “Pierre was one of those people who are strong only when they feel completely clean.” And since that day, how he felt the sense of desire he felt when looking at Helen’s bare shoulders… the unconscious sense of guilt of this desire paralyzed his determination. “Guests are gathering at the name-day parties.” Pierre and Helen are sitting side by side. “Pierre feels that jokes and animated conversations are feigned and all the attention of the guests is drawn only to them. “Bezukhov understands exactly what is expected of him, he feels guilty.” Pierre recalls how imperceptibly he gradually came to the need to marry. “The guests part, Pierre remains alone with Helene in the small drawing room.” They and Ra T he longer is often left alone, but never Pierre did not start talking about love. “Now he feels it’s necessary, but I still can not decide. Pierre speaks about other things. In the next room,” waiting “Prince Vasili and his wife, which from time to time goes to see what Pierre and Helene are doing. Prince Vasily proceeds to take decisive action: he enters the drawing room and joyfully announces to Pierre: “My wife told me everything…” The prince and the princess congratulate Pierre and Helen. The young man realizes that it is already late, and Elena admits helplessly in love in love.
In a month and a half, Pierre and Helen get married and settle in a large, newly decorated St. Petersburg house Bezukhovs.
The old prince Bolkonsky receives a letter from Prince Vasily, in which he informs him that he will call on his way to his “old benefactor” along with his son Anatol. Bolkonsky never had a high opinion of Prince Vasily, and the last rumors and allusions of the “little princess” (Andrei’s wife) only intensified his dislike of Kuragin. Before the arrival of Prince Vasily, Bolkonsky is in a bad mood, and having learned that the courtyards have cleared the way for the arrival of the minister, he orders “to cast her back” with snow. “Little Princess” lives in Bald Hills in constant fear of the old prince, subconsciously feels antipathy towards him. The old man also dislikes the daughter-in-law; his dislike is drowned out by contempt. ” “Little Princess” draws close to Mademoiselle Bourien, who dedicates in all his secrets, discusses with her father-in-law, etc. Soon the Kuragins come. On the way, Prince Vasily asks his son to be respectful with the old Bolkonsky, as much depends on this (Marya Bolkonskaya is one of the richest brides in Russia). Princess Mary also worries before the arrival of guests, since in the light there are already persistent rumors that Anatol “has intentions” towards her. “Little Princess” and Mademoiselle Bourien try to dress Princess Marya, but she is too scared, and they do not work. “Mademoiselle Bourien and the little princess had to admit to themselves that Princess Mary in this form was very bad, worse than ever, but it was too late.” Anatole makes a dazzling impression on Marya: he behaves with her self-assuredly, slightly condescendingly, Mademoiselle Bourien is keenly interested, that Princess Mary, when she married him, would take her with him. Old Bolkonsky understands that his daughter is ugly, that she is unlikely to marry for love, and wondered why she should marry at all: before her eyes is an example of a “little princess” who has a wonderful husband (Andrei), and yet she is unhappy. In the end, the old prince decides that he will give his daughter for Anatol, but “let him be worth it.” The old prince is quizzically interested in the sake of whom the ladies are so dressed up. He notices his daughter-in-law: “You have complete will-with,” and then adds about Mary: “And she has nothing to mutilate herself – and so is bad.” Bolkonsky asks Anatoly about the place of his service, but he is not able to remember, “what” he is listed, and laughs. The old prince also laughs and adds: “Gloriously serves!” Prince Vasily Bolkonsky says he does not intend to keep his daughter close to him, but still he would like to get to know his future son-in-law more closely. “Princess Mary did not think at all and did not remember her face and hair.” The beautiful, open face of a man who may be her husband absorbed all her attention. “He seemed kind, brave, resolute, courageous and generous. “Thousands of dreams of a future family life were incessantly arising in her imagination…” Mademoiselle Bourien also has secret thoughts about Anatole – she understands that, having no position in society, no wealth, she has nothing to count on official relations, but in her imagination you a romantic picture is drawn of a seduced girl thrown by a noble and rich prince, who, however, then, having taken pity, marries her. All the evening Anatole looks at Princess Marya, but under the piano she touches the leg of Mademoiselle Bourien. Left alone, the princess gives herself up to dreams, endowing Anatol with all conceivable virtues. Mademoiselle Bourien, too. The old prince is annoyed that “the first counter appeared – and the father and everything is forgotten…”. He gives vent to his irritation, telling his daughter that in fact Anatole intends to take care of Bourien. In the morning the prince resumes his conversation with his daughter: “He will take you with a dowry, and, incidentally, he will be captured by Mademoiselle Bourien, who will be his wife, and you…” Father adds that if Anatoly is ordered, he marries anyone, not only on Mary. Bolkonsky offers his daughter to think alone, and an hour later to announce his decision. Princess Mary goes to her room and, passing by the winter garden, finds Anatole there with Bourien. He hugs mademoiselle by the waist, and something whispers in her ear. An hour later the servant invites Marya to come down and finds Mademoiselle Bourien, crying in the embrace of the princess. Marya comforts the girl, says she forgives her, wants happiness and Mary goes to her father and announces her decision: she does not want to marry Anatoly and stays with her father. Returning to her room, the princess thinks: “My calling is different – my vocation is to be happy with other happiness, happiness of love and self-sacrifice.” She is going, in spite of everything, to arrange the happiness of Mademoiselle Bourien, since she “so sincerely repents.” that she forgives her, wishes happiness and Mary goes to her father and announces her decision: she does not want to marry Anatolia and remains with her father. Returning to her room, the princess thinks: “My calling is different – my vocation is to be happy with other happiness, happiness of love and self-sacrifice.” She is going, in spite of everything, to arrange the happiness of Mademoiselle Bourien, since she “so sincerely repents.” that she forgives her, wishes happiness and Mary goes to her father and announces her decision: she does not want to marry Anatolia and remains with her father. Returning to her room, the princess thinks: “My calling is different – my vocation is to be happy with other happiness, happiness of love and self-sacrifice.” She is going, in spite of everything, to arrange the happiness of Mademoiselle Bourien, since she “so sincerely repents.”
Rostovs for a long time had no news from Nicholas, but finally receive a letter. Anna Mikhailovna is here and tries to prepare the mother of “Nicholas” and his other relatives for news. Natasha first feels that her brother has appeared, and is asked to ask Anna Mikhailovna. She says that Nicholas was wounded, but already recovered and now promoted to officers. Natasha asks Sonya if she is going to write to Nicholas. Sonia for a long time suffers, not knowing how to proceed. In turn, Sonia is interested in Natasha, whether she remembers Boris. She replies that she does not remember. Natasha says that she was ashamed to write to Boris, and the younger Petya remarks that “they are in love with someone all the time.” According to him, her sister was in love “with a fat with glasses (Pierre)”, and then an Italian teacher of singing. After dinner, Anna Mikhailovna sends a letter to the Countess. She cries, Vera says that we should rejoice, and not cry, “and although her words were justified, all those present reproached her with reproach.” All households write letters to Nikolai and send them through Anna Mikhailovna, who “even had protection in the army”.
Rostov receives news from Boris, who is with his part is nearby. Boris has letters and money for him. Money comes by the way – Rostov needs a new outfit, and he is glad to hear from the house. Boris lodges with Berg – they have a lot in common in characters. In general, during the campaign, Boris started a lot of useful and necessary acquaintances – having resorted to the help of a letter of recommendation from Pierre, he met Andrei Bolkonsky, who, as Boris hopes, will help him get a place in the headquarters of the commander-in-chief. Rostov comes to Boris, rejoices at the meeting. He changed a lot, became a “true hussar”, on his uniform – George’s cross. Boris says that they, too, made a “glorious campaign”: with their regiment the Tsarevich rode, so there were conveniences and luxurious receptions. Rostov reads the letter, without ceremony exposes Berg, wishing to be alone with a childhood friend, reproaches herself for not writing home for a long time. Among letters from his relatives, Rostov also receives a letter of recommendation to Prince Bagration. Nicholas ardently states that he will not go to the adjutants to anyone, and throws the letter under the table. In his opinion, this is a lackey’s position. Boris objects – he would gladly go to the adjutants, as he wants to make a “brilliant career.” At dinner Boris and Berg in detail describe to Nicholas his military life, his meetings with the Grand Duke and so on. Rostov in response tells how he was wounded – “but not as it really was, but as he would like, as he heard from other storytellers.” During his narrative, Andrei Bolkonsky enters, who, having received a letter of recommendation from Boris the day before, hoped to find him alone. ” Seeing the military adventures of the army hussar (a sort of people that Prince Andrew could not tolerate), he winced, then makes several mocking phrases about the story of Rostov. Nikola flares up, declares that “his story is the story of the man who was in battle in the very fire of the enemy, not the chatter of staff thugs, “who receive awards, doing nothing. Bolkonsky says he understands that Rostov wants to offend him, but” the place and time for this are very badly chosen, “and adds that from both parties are better to put the matter without consequences. Calm and confident tone of Prince Andrew to make a strong impression of Rostov, and in spite of the fury and hatred of this “scrap adyutantiku” Nicholas feels that no one has ever caused him such respect.
The next day, a review of the troops was announced. Rostov also takes part in it. The king bypasses the formation. Rostov together with all is experiencing a sense of delight. Among others, he sees Bolkonsky in his retinue, “lazily and leisurely sitting on a horse”. Obeying enthralled him, Rostov finally decides not to call Bolkonski to duel, since now he loves and forgives all.
The next day after the review Boris goes to the headquarters to Prince Andrew, hoping with his help to get the place of adjutant. Boris is greatly impressed by arrogant, successful adjutants, for him their world becomes even more tempting. He finds Prince Andrew behind talking with some general who fawns on him and stands at attention. “At that moment, Boris was already clearly aware of what he had foreseen before-namely, that in the army, besides that subordination and discipline that was written in the statute and which was known in the regiment and he knew, there was another, more substantial subordination, the one who forced this general, with the purple face of the general, to wait respectfully, while the captain Prince Andrew, for his pleasure, found it more convenient to talk with ensign Drubetskiy. ” Bolkonsky tells Boris, that soon the adjutants would have a whole regiment, that Kutuzov’s headquarters now lost its importance and the most important thing was happening only with the emperor. He promises to attach Boris to his friend, Prince Dolgorukov, who is in the royal suite, “closer to the sun.” They find Dolgorukov at the moment of returning from the meeting at the headquarters, where the question of an immediate offensive was discussed. Napoleon sends a letter to the Russian tsar in order to gain time. Dolgorukov is only concerned with these issues and the request of the young man, whom Bolkonsky brought with him, leaves “until the next time.” They find Dolgorukov at the moment of returning from the meeting at the headquarters, where the question of an immediate offensive was discussed. Napoleon sends a letter to the Russian tsar in order to gain time. Dolgorukov is only concerned with these issues and the request of the young man, whom Bolkonsky brought with him, leaves “until the next time.” They find Dolgorukov at the moment of returning from the meeting at the headquarters, where the question of an immediate offensive was discussed. Napoleon sends a letter to the Russian tsar in order to gain time. Dolgorukov is only concerned with these issues and the request of the young man, whom Bolkonsky brought with him, leaves “until the next time.”
The next day the troops march on, and to the very battle of Austerlitz, Boris remains in his Izmailovsky regiment. A few days later there is a small battle, they say about the victory, but Rostov’s squadron does not take part in the fighting. Hussars languish from forced idleness. Past prisoners are carried. Rostov buys a “trophy” French horse for himself. Russian soldiers treat the prisoners well, they see that they themselves do not really understand what is happening. Suddenly the rumor spreads that the king arrived in the squadron. The emperor passes along the line and for a while stops his gaze on Rostov. The young man experiences a flood of loyalty. The king wishes to be personally present during the hostilities. The last success is reduced to the capture of the French squadron, but this trifle is represented as “the greatest Victoria.” Past the wounded soldier, Rostov notices the suffering that appeared on the sovereign’s face. Rostov is filled with even greater love for the tsar – “he really was in love with both the tsar and the glory of Russian arms, and in the hope of a future triumph.” The next day the emperor arrives with a proposal to personally meet with Napoleon. He refuses, but sends with the reply of his parliamentarian. “A political game is started to win time, and the result of all the complex human movements of these hundred and sixty thousand Russians and French – all the passions, desires, remorse, humiliation, suffering, gusts of pride, fear, delight of these people – was only the defeat of the Austerlitz battle.” Bolkonsky and Dolgorukov talk about Bonaparte. Dolgoruky says that he saw Napoleon and he had the impression, as if he was afraid of the fire as a general battle. Prince Andrew offers his battle plan, but another plan has already been approved. Dolgorukov has no interest in what Prince Andrew says. Returning home, Bolkonsky does not stand up and asks Kutuzov next to him that he is thinking about the impending battle. Kutuzov believes that, probably, the battle will be lost, he says that he asked Count Tolstoy to tell the sovereign, to which he replied that he was engaged in cutlets and rice, and let Kutuzov do military affairs. Weyrother, who developed the battle plan, “the opposite of displeased – sleepy Kutuzov,” is developing a stormy activity. Kutuzov arrives at the council, where Weyrother makes a report. Kutuzov falls asleep at the very beginning of the report. The Austrian reads his disposition – complicated, confusing, almost incomprehensible to anyone. Many do not approve of the plan of the attack, but nothing can be changed. Bolkonsky tries to speak on the council, but without success. It seems to him that he will distinguish himself in tomorrow’s battle, that he “will build a disposition, and himself, one will win the battle, Kutuzov will be replaced and Bolkonsky will be appointed to the post of commander-in-chief.” Prince Andrew confesses to himself that he loves fame most of all – no matter how dear to him, his father, sister, wife, he “without hesitation, would give them for a moment of glory, triumph over people, for the love of people I do not know, and I will not know. “
In his regiment anxiously waiting for the upcoming battle, Nikolai Rostov. He is sorry that their regiment will be in reserve, he wants to ask to send him “into business”, since this is the only way to see the sovereign. Nicholas remembers his family, Natasha. There is a noise in the enemy’s camp. Appears Bagration, asks what it means. Rostov is called to go and find out. He finds out that on the mountain there is a picket and that the French did not retreat to new positions, as the Austrian general assumed. Rostov reports this to Bagration and again asks “to do business.” He suggests that he stay with him as an orderly. Screams from the enemy were caused by reading Napoleon’s order to the soldiers. The emperor promises himself to lead the troops into battle, and if the soldiers fight bravely, he will be far from the battlefield, but if even for a moment doubts the success, he himself will appear at the head of his army. Napoleon calls on the soldiers to strengthen the glory of France and win. The next day the battle begins. The enemy is not at all where it was expected, the authorities do not receive timely orders, the fog prevents the advance of the army. Napoleon awaits battle – today is the anniversary of his coronation.
Prince Andrew in the suite Kutuzov with excitement is waiting for the opportunity that will bring him fame. Kutuzov is angry, he sees that the high command is acting ineptly, in a mediocre disposition. The king appears with the question why they do not start the battle – “because we are not on the Tsaritsyn meadow.” Kutuzov says that’s why they do not start. The retinue perceives this sharpness with irritation. The king gives the order to start the battle. The Apsheron regiment is sent to the march, because of the fog they do not see what is happening ahead. Together with the suite of Kutuzov, Prince Andrew rises to the mountain and sees from there that in five hundred steps directly in front of the Apsheron there is an enemy. Deciding that his hour has come, Bolkonsky states that the Apsheronians must be stopped, and it is called to do so. But it’s too late: after mixing up, the soldiers and officers flee into a pile. In the retinue of Kutuzov there are only four people. The French are attacking the battery, they are starting to fire at Kutuzov. The wounded standard-bearer is falling. Prince Andrew jumps off the horse, picks up the banner. The regiment follows him. Bolkonsky reaches almost to the guns, but he is wounded, and he falls. Prince Andrew opens his eyes to see how the struggle ended, but “he did not see anything.” There was nothing above him except the sky – a high sky, not clear, but still immeasurably high, with gray clouds creeping across it. ” How quiet, calm and solemn, not at all like I ran, thought Prince Andrew, not as we ran, shouted and fought; … the clouds are not so crawling about this high, infinite sky. How could I not see before this high sky? And how happy I am that I recognized him, at last. Yes! Everything is empty, all lies, except this infinite sky. Nothing, nothing, except him. But even that is not, there is nothing but silence and tranquility. “The high sky of Austerlitz is a sign of changes in the fate and character of Prince Andrew.” The next day, the battle resumes. “Bagration” has not yet begun. “Rostov is sent for explanations to Kutuzov or the Rostov encounters the Guards infantry in which he meets Boris and Berg. They are animated, because they have been “in business,” Berg is wounded. Suddenly Rostov encounters the enemy where he least expected him to meet: in the rear of our troops Our soldiers are fleeing, Rostov is terrified. he can not find a fuss, and ridiculous rumors spread to Rostov that Kutuzov was either killed or wounded, that the tsar fled and was also wounded, etc. Rostov finds the sovereign, he is pale, dejected, his cheeks have fallen, his eyes fell. Rostov does not dare to approach the king and goes back.
By evening it becomes obvious that the battle is lost on all points.
Prince Andrew lies with a banner in his hands in oblivion. He wakes up and notices that there are riding horses nearby. Bolkonsky recognizes Napoleon, who is walking along the battlefield with two adjutants. Looking at Prince Andrew, the French emperor says: “Here is a beautiful death!”
Andrei “felt… that he was bleeding, and he saw above him a distant, high eternal sky.” He knew that it was Napoleon, his hero, but at that moment Napoleon seemed to him an insignificant person in comparison with what was happening now between his soul and this high, infinite sky with clouds running on him. “It was absolutely all the same to him at that moment, no matter who stood over him, whatever he said about him, he was glad only that” people stopped over him, and wished only that these people would help him and bring him back to life, which seemed to him a table Fine, because he somehow knew it now. “Prince Andrew groans. Napoleon remarked that the wounded alive, and orders to raise it and move to the dressing station. Bolkonsky comes to life only in the hospital. Soon Napoleon arrives to inspect the prisoners, praises Russian soldiers for bravery, turns personally to Prince Andrew, but he does not answer, since all the thoughts of the genius commander, his vanity seem small and small. Napoleon departs, Prince Andrew gropes for himself on the chest of the image, presented by Princess Mary, understands that there is something more important in comparison with his former aspirations, it seems to him a happy life in the Bald Mountain, his family is remembered.
Soon, Prince Andrew among the rest of the hopeless wounded was left in the care of local residents.


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Summary War and peace in volumes, parts and chapters. Volume 1