Summary Stone visitor A. S. Pushkin

Summary Stone visitor A. S. Pushkin

A. Pushkin
Stone visitor
At the gates of Madrid sit Don Guan and his servant Leporello. They are going to wait here for the night to enter the city under its cover. Careless Don Guan believes that he will not be recognized in the city, but sober Leporello is sarcastically set about this. However, no danger can stop Don Guan. He is sure that the king, upon learning of his unauthorized return from exile, does not execute him, that the king sent him to exile in order to save the family of the nobleman he killed. But he can not stay in exile for a long time, most of all he is dissatisfied with the women there who seem to him wax puppets.
Looking around, Dong Guan learns the terrain. This is Antoniev Monastery, where he met his beloved Inese, who turned out to be a jealous husband. Poetically, Dong Guang describes her features and sad eyes. Leporello calms him down by the fact that Don Juan has and will have beloved ones. He is interested in who this time his master will be looking for in Madrite. Don Guan intends to seek Laura. As long as Don Juan dreams, a monk appears who, seeing the visitors, is wondering if they are the people of Dona Anna, who is about to arrive here at the grave of her husband, Commander de Solva, who was killed in a duel by “unscrupulous, godless Don Guan” , as the monk calls him, not knowing what he is saying with Don Guan himself. He says that the widow erected a monument to her husband and every day comes to pray for the

repose of his soul. Don Guan thinks that the widow’s behavior is strange, and he is wondering if she is good. He asks permission to talk to her, but the monk replies that Dona Anna does not talk to men. And at that time Dona Anna appears, the Monk unlocks the grate, and she passes, so that Don Guan does not have time to examine it, but his imagination, which, according to Leporello, is “faster than the painter,” is able to draw her portrait. Dong Guan decides to get to know Dona Anna, Leporello shames him for blasphemy. After conversations dusk, and the lord and servant enter Madrith. but his imagination, which, according to Leporello, “faster than the painter,” is capable of drawing her portrait. Dong Guan decides to get to know Dona Anna, Leporello shames him for blasphemy. After conversations dusk, and the lord and servant enter Madrith. but his imagination, which, according to Leporello, “faster than the painter,” is capable of drawing her portrait. Dong Guan decides to get to know Dona Anna, Leporello shames him for blasphemy. After conversations dusk, and the lord and servant enter Madrith.
In Laura’s room, guests are having supper and admiring her talent and inspired acting. They ask Laura to sing. Even the sullen Carlos seems to be touched by her singing, but upon learning that the words of this song were written by Don Guan who was Laura’s lover, Don Carlos calls him atheist and bastard. Angry Laura screams that now tells his servants to slaughter Carlos, although that Spanish grandee. Fearless Don Carlos is ready, but the guests reassure them. Laura believes that the reason for Carlos’s crude trick is that Don Guan on an honest duel killed his brother Don Carlos. Don Carlos admits that he was wrong, and they put up with it. After singing one more song at the general request, Laura bids farewell to the guests, but asks Don Carlos to stay. She says that with his temperament he reminded her of Don Guan. Laura and Don Carlos talk, and at this time there is a knock and someone calls Laura. Laura unlocks, and enters Don Guan. Carlos, hearing this name, calls himself and demands an immediate duel. Despite Laura’s protests, the giants are fighting, and Don Guan kills Don Carlos. Laura is in a state of confusion, but when he learns that Dong Guan just returned secretly to Madrith and immediately rushed to her, it softened.
After killing Don Carlos, Don Guan monks hide in the monastery in the monastery of Antoniev and standing at the monument to the commander, thanks the fate that she thus gave him the opportunity to see the lovely Don Anna every day. He intends to talk to her today and hopes that he will be able to attract her attention. Looking at the statue of the commander, Don Guan ironic that here the murdered is represented by a giant, although in his life he was frail. Dona Anna enters and notices the monk. She begs for forgiveness that prevented him from praying, to which the monk responds that it is he who is to blame for her, for her sorrow prevents her from “flowing freely”; he admires her beauty and angelic meekness. Such speeches surprise and embarrass Don Anne, and the monk unexpectedly confesses that under this dress the nobleman Diego de Calvada, the victim of an unhappy passion for her, hides. With dirty speeches Don Kahn persuades Don Anne not to drive him, and Dona Anna, embarrassed, suggests that he come to her house the next day, provided he is modest. Dona Anna leaves, and Dong Guan demands that Leporello invite a statue of the commander for tomorrow’s meeting. To the timid Leporello it seems that the statue nods in response to this blasphemous sentence. Don Guan himself repeats his invitation, and the statue nods again. Affected Don Guan and Leporello leave.
Dona Anna talks to Don Diego in her house. She admits that Don Alvar was not her chosen one, that her mother forced her to marry her. Don Diego envies the commander, who in exchange for empty wealth got true bliss. Such speeches confuse Don Anne. She is reproached with the thought of the deceased husband, who would never have accepted a lady in love with him, he turned out to be a widower. Don Diego asks her not to torment his heart with eternal reminders of her husband, although he deserves a penalty. Dona Anna is interested in what exactly did Diego Diego, and in response to her persistent requests, Dong Guan reveals to her his real name, the name of the murderer of her husband. Dona Anna is amazed and, under the influence of what happened, is deprived of feelings. Coming to, she drives Don Juan. Don Guan agrees that rumor does not in vain depict him as a villain, but assures himself that he has reborn, having experienced love for her. As a pledge of parting before parting, he asks to give him a cold peace kiss. Dona Anna kisses him, and Don Juan leaves, but immediately rushes back in. Next to him is a statue of the commander, who appeared at the call. The Commander blames Don Guan for cowardice, but he bravely extends a hand to shake a stone statue, from which he dies with the name of Dona Anna on her lips.


Summary Stone visitor A. S. Pushkin