Summary of Kühl

Summary of Kühl

Yu. N. Tynyanov
Kuhlya
Wilhelm graduated with honors from the boarding school. Relatives decide to identify him in the newly founded Tsarskoye Selo Lyceum. At a reception with Minister Razumovsky, he meets with Misha Yakovlev, Vanya Pushchin, Anton Delvig. Vasily Lvovich Pushkin brings his nephew Sasha there. On October 19, 1811, in the presence of the tsar and the persons close to him, the lyceum was ceremonially opened. Wilhelm does not stop to listen to the inspired speech of the professor of moral sciences Kunitsyn.
At the Lyceum, Wilhelm receives the nickname Kühl. His comrades love him, but every now and then they make fun of him. After the “pasias” Yakovlev, laughing parodically, depicts the scene of the engagement of Kiukhli with the girl Minkhen, Wilhelm desperately runs into the pond. They save him. “You’re not Poor Liza,” exhorts another sensible Pushchin.
Kiukhl studies well, he is obsessed with ambition and secretly dreams that the great Derzhavin will give his lyre to him, Wilhelm Kiichelbecker. However, on the transfer exam in December 1814, Pushkin’s poetry produced the greatest impression on Derzhavin’s lyceum. Wilhelm sincerely rejoices for his friend: “Alexander, I’m proud of you. Be happy.” Pushkin leads Kühl to the company of the hussar Kaverin, where freedom-loving conversations are conducted,
After graduating from the lyceum, Küchelbecker teaches Russian literature

in a noble boarding school at the Pedagogical Institute. He now devotes his poems to Zhukovsky. With Pushkin, the relationship is not quite smooth: because of the caustic epigram with the words “and kykhelkberno and sickening” the case once comes to a duel, ending, fortunately, reconciliation.
Teaching soon gets bored with Wilhelm, he wants on Pushkin’s advice to fully engage in literature, attends the “Thursdays” of the influential journalist Grech, where he meets Ryleev and Griboyedov. In the press appear bold verses Kuchelbecker, in which he supports the exiled to the south of Pushkin. Kukhlya is with Nikolai Ivanovich Turgenev, where he meets Kunitsyn again, with lyceum friends, and takes part in political debates. Soon he resigns and travels abroad as the secretary of nobleman Naryshkin.
Freedom! Freedom! In Germany, Wilhelm is full of diverse impressions, he had a chance to talk with Ludwig Tik and even with the great Goethe. In the meantime, the tsar is being informed of seditious verses by Kiichelbecker, and he orders to establish secret supervision over the young poet. In Paris, in the Athenaeum hall, Wilhelm lectures on Russian literature, openly speaking out against serfdom. He is expelled from France by order of the prefect of the police. After visiting Italy, Kiichelbecker returns to St. Petersburg.
Here he can not find a service in any way, until the tsar decides to send “a troubled young man to an equally troubled country” – to the Caucasus, to the office of General Yermolov. Wilhelm has a romantic project to “move” Ermolov to Greece, to help the rebels there. Griboyedov soberly advises his friend to “cool down a little.” And Kiichelbecker himself begins to look at things differently after Yermolov orders to shoot one of the Circassian leaders before his eyes.
After serving not long in the Caucasus, Wilhelm settles in the Smolensk estate. Purchase from his sister Ustinky and her husband Grigory Andreevich Glinka. He falls in love with Dunya Pushkin, who came to Glinka, and young people swear to each other in love, but the material circumstances do not allow even to think about getting married. The restless nature of Wilhelm gives a lot of trouble to relatives: he, along with servant Semyon, clothed in peasant clothes, then, seeing the neighbor-landowner torturing the tar-covered peasant, he will teach the whip of the brutalized feudal lord. Kiichelbecker again appears in Moscow, then in Petersburg, where he is engaged in black journal work with Grech and Bulgarin. He settles at home, Alexander Odoyevsky, supporting a friend and emotional participation, and money.
Rileyev, who is preparing an uprising, accepts Kiichelbecker as a member of the secret society. On December 14, with two pistols behind his belt, Wilhelm rushes between the Moscow and Finnish regiments, trying to track down the hiding Trubetskoi. Having appeared together in the brother of Misha and Ivan Pushchin among the officers and soldiers of the Guards crew, Wilhelm thrice aimed at the Grand Duke Michael, but every time a misfire occurs. The rebels begin to fire from the guns. Wilhelm wants to raise people and lead them into battle, but it’s too late: it remains to throw the gun in the snow and leave the square.
The collegiate assessor Kiichelbecker is searched for by the highest order everywhere. Wilhelm meanwhile manages to get to Zabup, then to get to Warsaw, where he is recognized by the signs indicated in the billboard and arrested. Dunya tries to work for the groom, reaches Nicholas himself, asks permission to marry Wilhelm and follow him to Siberia, but receives a refusal.
Kyuhlya languishes in solitary confinement, leading imaginary conversations with friends, remembering the past. He is transferred to the fortress of Dinaburg, on the way there is a chance meeting with a passing Pushkin. From the fortress Wilhelm writes to Griboyedov, not knowing that he already died in Tehran. The last wanderings of Kiukhli begin: Barguzin, Aksha, Kurgan, Tobolsk.
In Barguzin, Wilhelm builds himself a hut, gradually forgets about Dunya, then receives from her the last letter: “I decided not to go to you.” The heart is getting old. After all, forty have knocked at us. ” Wilhelm marries the rough and muzhik daughter of the postmaster Droniushka. A month after the wedding, he learns that some guardsman killed in a duel Pushkin. On the way to Kurgan, Wilhelm spent three days in Yalutorovsk near Pushchino, provoking his friend’s sincere pity and his decrepit appearance, and a failed family life. During the dying disease, Kiukhl sees Griboyedov in a dream, speaks with Pushkin in oblivion, recalls Dunya. “He was lying straight, with a snub-nosed gray beard, a pointed nose, raised up, and rolled-up eyes.”


Summary of Kühl