Summary “Henry IV”

Summary “Henry IV”

After false reports of victory, Earl of Northumberland finally learns that his son Hotsper was killed in the Battle of Shrewsbury and that the Royal Army, led by the second son of King John Lancaster and Earl Westmoreland, is heading towards him. The Earl decides to unite his troops with the forces of the rebellious archbishop of York.

In London, the Chief Justice, when he met Falstaff on the street, shames him for his bad behavior and encourages him to mature in his old age. The fat man, as always, scoffs, brags and does not miss an opportunity to remind the judge of the slap that he received from Prince Henry, the patron of Falstaff.

In York, the archbishop’s approximate members weigh their chances of victory. They are encouraged by the fact that only a third of the

royal troops, led by Prince John and Earl Westmoreland, are moving on them. The king himself and his eldest son opposed the Welshmen of Glendaur, another part of the royal army must resist the French. Yet some of the rebellious lords believe that they can not stand without the help of Count Nortemberland. In London, Mrs. Kuikli (“Fast”, “Vostrushka” – English), the owner of the tavern “Cabana head”, seeks to arrest Falstaff for his debts and failure to fulfill his promise to marry. Falstaff intervenes with her, with the police and the supreme judge appearing on the street, bringing in his defense the most unexpected and comical arguments. Finally, he manages to lure the widow Kuikli not only forgiveness of his former debts, but also a new loan, as well as an invitation to dinner. Returning to London, Prince Henry and Poyns, learning about this dinner, decide to change their servants and serve on it to see Falstaff “in its present form.” The return of the royal army to the capital was caused by the severe illness of Henry IV. His eldest son is deeply saddened by his father’s illness, but hides it in order not to be a hypocrite.

At Warworth, the castle of Earl of Northumberland, the widowed Lady Percy is ashamed of her father-in-law for the loss of Hotsper, who was left without

reinforcements because of his feigned illness. She and the Count’s wife insist that he fled to Scotland, instead of speaking to the aid of the Archbishop of York.

To Falstaff, Mrs. Kuikli and Dolle Tershit (“Tearing sheet” – English), cheerfully feasting in the tavern, join Bardolph and the pompous ensign Pistol. The Prince and Pines, who put on servants’ jackets, are witnessing a thrilling scene between Falstaff and Dolle and hear that, in the opinion of the old reveler, the prince is a “good fellow, although foolish,” Poynes is a baboon with a place on the gallows, and much more. When indignant Henry is about to drag Falstaff by his ears, he recognizes his patron and immediately explains that “he spoke ill of him to fallen creatures so that these fallen creatures would not like to love him.” I acted as a caring friend and loyal subject. ” The fun ends suddenly, as the prince and Falstaff are calling for weapons to oppose the northern rebels. Falstaff still manages to sneak out and,

In Westminster Palace, the tortured king reflects on sleepless nights – the lot of every monarch – and remembers that the murdered Richard II foresaw a gap between him and Percy’s house. In an effort to raise the mood of the king, Earl Warwick diminishes the power of the insurgents and reports the death of Owen Glendaur, the rebellious owner of Wales. In Gloucestershire, Falstaff, recruiting, greets a friend of his youth – Judge Shelou (“Empty” – English). Having talked to the recruits, he takes the bribe free of those fit for service and leaves the unadapted ones – Mozzljak, Shadow and Wart. Falstaff goes on a campaign with a firm intention on the way back to rob the old friend.

In the Yorkshire forest, the Archbishop of York informs his companions that Northumberland left them and, without gathering troops, fled to Scotland. The Earl of Westmoreland tries to reconcile the rebellious lords with the king and convinces them to make peace with Prince John. Lord Mowbray is overpowered by misgivings, but the archbishop convinces him that the king longs for peace in the kingdom at any cost. At a meeting with the rebels, the prince promises that all their demands will be met, and drinks for their health. The conspirators are dismissing the troops, and the treacherous prince arrests them for treason. He orders to pursue the disparate rebel troops and deal with them.

The king is in the Jerusalem Chamber of Westminster. He persuades his younger sons to maintain a good relationship with Prince Henry, whose favors they will depend on in the future. He complains about the diligence of the heir. Earl Warwick tries to find excuses for Henry, but they do not convince the king. The Earl of Westmoreland brings news that Prince John has suppressed a mutiny. The second messenger also reports on the victory – the Yorkshire sheriff defeated the forces of Northumberland and the Scots. However, from the joyful news the king becomes ill. He is taken to bed. While the king is asleep, Prince Henry enters his room. Deciding that his father is already dead, Henry puts on the crown and leaves. The awakened king learns that the prince went to him, and, not finding the crown, bitterly accuses his son: “Your whole life was proving plainly / That you do not love me, and I wanted you, / That in the hour of death I be sure of this. “The prince hastens to explain his deed: he assures his father that he considered him dead and took the crown only in fulfillment of his duty.” The son, touched by the eloquence of his son, calls him to his bedside. went to power, and although he considers the position of his son to be more stable, he warns him against strife inside the country: “Lead the war in foreign lands, my Henry, / To take the hot heads…” Having learned that he felt bad in the Jerusalem chamber, the king recalls the prophecy according to which he must to finish life in Jerusalem, the King always believed that the Holy Land was meant, but now he understands the true meaning of the prediction and asks him again to take him to the same chamber: “There, in Jerusalem, I’ll give up the spirit of the sky.” He assures his father that he found him dead and took the crown only to fulfill his duty. Touched by the eloquence of his son, the king beckons him to his head. He recalls the devious ways in which he came to power, and although he considers the position of his son to be more stable, he warns him against strife within the country: “Lead the war in foreign lands, my Henry, / To get the hot heads off…” bad in the Jerusalem chamber, the king remembers the prophecy that he must end his life in Jerusalem. The king always believed that the Holy Land was meant. Now he understands the true meaning of the prediction and asks him again to take him to the same chamber: “There, in Jerusalem, I’ll betray the spirit.” He assures his father that he found him dead and took the crown only to fulfill his duty. Touched by the eloquence of his son, the king beckons him to his head. He recalls the devious ways in which he came to power, and although he considers the position of his son to be more stable, he warns him against strife inside the country: “Lead the war in foreign lands, my Henry, / To get the hot heads off…” bad in the Jerusalem chamber, the king remembers the prophecy that he must end his life in Jerusalem. The king always believed that the Holy Land was meant. Now he understands the true meaning of the prediction and asks him again to take him to the same chamber: “There, in Jerusalem, I’ll betray the spirit.” He recalls the devious ways in which he came to power, and although he considers the position of his son to be more stable, he warns him against strife within the country: “Lead the war in foreign lands, my Henry, / To get the hot heads off…” bad in the Jerusalem chamber, the king remembers the prophecy that he must end his life in Jerusalem. The king always believed that the Holy Land was meant. Now he understands the true meaning of the prediction and asks him again to take him to the same chamber: “There, in Jerusalem, I’ll betray the spirit.” He recalls the devious ways in which he came to power, and although he considers the position of his son to be more stable, he warns him against strife inside the country: “Lead the war in foreign lands, my Henry, / To get the hot heads off…” bad in the Jerusalem chamber, the king remembers the prophecy that he must end his life in Jerusalem. The king always believed that the Holy Land was meant. Now he understands the true meaning of the prediction and asks him again to take him to the same chamber: “There, in Jerusalem, I’ll betray the spirit.” the king remembers the prophecy that he must end his life in Jerusalem. The king always believed that the Holy Land was meant. Now he understands the true meaning of the prediction and asks him again to take him to the same chamber: “There, in Jerusalem, I’ll betray the spirit.” the king remembers the prophecy that he must end his life in Jerusalem. The king always believed that the Holy Land was meant. Now he understands the true meaning of the prediction and asks him again to take him to the same chamber: “There, in Jerusalem, I’ll betray the spirit.”

In Westminster, the young king assures the brothers that they have nothing to worry about their fate during his reign. The High Judge, once imprisoned by Henry in prison for insulting his rank, is forgiven and approached for his firmness and fearlessness. Henry says: “In my coffin with my father my disingenuousness came down.”

Falstaff, learning about the accession of his patron, hurries to London. During the coronation, he becomes in a prominent place. He is waiting for extraordinary honors from an old friend and promises to share them with his appointments, including with Shelou, who managed to pay a lot of debts. But the outgoing to the people of Henry on the familiar appeal of Falstaff answers: “Old man, with you I’m a stranger.” Repent! / Gray hair is not at all to the jester’s face. ” The king expels the former friends, promising them to give the means to life, so that “the need for evil does not push you.” Falstaff is sure that Henry’s sternness is feigned, but the incoming Supreme Judge orders him to be arrested with his friends and imprisoned. Prince John tells the judge: “I like the act of the emperor, / Intends to provide his former companions / He provide, but he drove them all out / And will not return,


Summary “Henry IV”