“Legend of Sleepy Hollow” by Irving in brief summary

“Legend of Sleepy Hollow” by Irving in brief summary

On the eastern shore of the Hudson, in the depths of one of the bays, there is a village, not far from it there is a hollow, which for its quiet and serenity, and also for the phlegmatic disposition of its inhabitants, was called Sleepy. The place seems to be under some kind of spell, fascinating the minds of local residents who live in a world of dreaming reality. The whole district is replete with legends, “unclean places,” superstitions. The main spirit visiting this enchanted place is the Headless Horseman. It is said that this is the shadow of the Hessian cavalryman, who in the battle was torn off by a cannonball; His body is buried inside the church fence, and the spirit picks at night in search of a severed head. In those places about thirty years ago there lived a poor

rural teacher Ikabod Crane – a lanky clumsy young man, a conscientious teacher who sacredly observed the rule “who pities the rod, he spoils the child “and confident that the offending scoundrel” will remember and thank him for the rest of his days. “He was a mixture of wickedness and naivete, he liked to flash education, especially in front of pretty girls, was the regent of the church choir, and also had an enviable appetite. His favorite book was The History of Witchcraft in New England by Cotton Mezer, and he knew it by heart. Ikabod Crane fell in love with Katrina van Tassel, the only daughter of a wealthy farmer, a beauty whose favor all local young people sought di. The most serious rival of Ichabod was Brom Beaune, mischievous village lad, strong and brave. Once Ichabod invited to Van Tassel on holiday. To look decent, Ichabod cleaned out his old black suit, carefully combing his hair in front of a piece of broken mirror and borrowed from the owner of the house where he lodged, a horse – an old stubborn one. The soul of the holiday was Brom Bone, who came riding on the Devil – a hot raven horse. Ichabod, rejoicing at a tasty treat, dreamed that one day he would marry Katrina and pick up the farm van Tassely. After the dance, everyone began to talk about spirits and ghosts, and Brom Bon
told the story of how one night he met the Horseman without a head and invited him to “measure in the leap, promising, in case of defeat, to bring a” headless “bowl of excellent punch.” Bone almost won, but on the church bridge the Hessian burst forth, bursting into a fiery flash and disappeared. After the holiday, Ichabod stayed, wanting to talk privately with his beloved, but their conversation was short-lived, and Ichabod withdrew in complete despair. Returning home at night, he noticed a horseman of a heroic constitution on a mighty black horse. Ichabod galloped forward in fear, but the rider did not lag behind. At some point, the figure of the rider clearly outlined against the background of the night sky, and Ichabod saw that the rider’s head was not in the right place, but tied to the bow of the saddle. Ikabod’s horse raced like a whirlwind, but in the middle of the ravine gully weakened, and the saddle slid to the ground. Ichabod flashed the thought of how angry the owner who lent him the festive saddle, but now he was not up to the saddle: he was hurrying to the church bridge, remembering that it was there that the specter disappeared, competed with Brom Bons. Suddenly, Ichabod saw the horseman get up in the stirrups and throw him in his head. The head struck with a crash on the skull of Ichabod, and he collapsed to the ground unconscious. The next morning the old horse, without a saddle and without a rider, returned to the owner. During the search, a broken saddle was found, and behind the bridge near the creek was Ichaboda’s hat and a smashed pumpkin. The locals decided that Ikaboda had taken the Horseman headless, but an old farmer, several years after the incident, traveled to New York, said that Ichabod Crane was alive and well. Moving to the other end of the country, he became a politician, a deputy, wrote in the newspapers and in the end became a justice of the peace. As for Brom Bons, he married Katrina van Tassel, and it was noticed that whenever he was told the story of Ichabod, his linden appeared slyly, and at the mention of the pumpkin he began to laugh out loud. and behind the bridge near the creek – Ichaboda’s hat and smashed pumpkin. The locals decided that Ikaboda had taken the Horseman headless, but an old farmer, several years after the incident, traveled to New York, said that Ichabod Crane was alive and well. Moving to the other end of the country, he became a politician, a deputy, wrote in the newspapers and in the end became a justice of the peace. As for Brom Bons, he married Katrina van Tassel, and it was noticed that whenever he was told the story of Ichabod, his linden appeared slyly, and at the mention of the pumpkin he began to laugh out loud. and behind the bridge near the creek – Ichaboda’s hat and smashed pumpkin. The locals decided that Ikaboda had taken the Horseman headless, but an old farmer, several years after the incident, traveled to New York, said that Ichabod Crane was alive and well. Moving to the other end of the country, he became a politician, a deputy, wrote in the newspapers and in the end became a justice of the peace. As for Brom Bons, he married Katrina van Tassel, and it was noticed that whenever he was told the story of Ichabod, his linden appeared slyly, and at the mention of the pumpkin he began to laugh out loud. he became a politician, a deputy, wrote in the newspapers and in the end became a justice of the peace. As for Brom Bons, he married Katrina van Tassel, and it was noticed that whenever he was told the story of Ichabod, his linden appeared slyly, and at the mention of the pumpkin he began to laugh out loud. he became a politician, a deputy, wrote in the newspapers and in the end became a justice of the peace. As for Brom Bons, he married Katrina van Tassel, and it was noticed that whenever he was told the story of Ichabod, his linden appeared slyly, and at the mention of the pumpkin he began to laugh out loud.


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“Legend of Sleepy Hollow” by Irving in brief summary