Summary of Aissa Sh

Summary of Aissa Sh

Charlotte Aissé (circa 1693, Circassia – March 13, 1733, Paris) is a French writer, known primarily for her correspondence, published under the title “Letters to Mrs. Calandrini” (Lettres de mademoiselle Aissé a madame Calandrini).
The origin is not entirely reliable: she called herself the daughter of the Circassian (probably Adyghe) prince, whose palace was plundered by the Turks, who kidnapped her and sold her into slavery. In 1698, at the age of four or five, she was bought from an Istanbul slave-merchant by the French envoy to the Ottoman Empire, de Ferriol, and taken to France. There, the girl received a magnificent education in the house of his younger brother’s wife. The original name of Circassian Haide (Haidé, perhaps the Turkish perception of the

name Ayshet) was changed to a more euphonious one – Aissa, which in fact became her surname; at baptism received the name of Charlotte-Elizabeth.
From her youth, Aissa revolved in high society, quickly gaining popularity with her exotic origins, beauty and manners. His novel with the Chevalier Blaise-Marie d’Eddie (from whom in 1721 a daughter was born) became famous; Also there were rumors about the location of the regent Philip of Orleans. The impossibility of marriage (the vows of the Maltese knight prescribed D’Edi celibacy) imposed a tragic imprint on their relationship. In 1726, Aissa met with Ms Julie Calandrini, the wife of a noble Geneva citizen, and for seven years, conducted a friendly correspondence with her, describing the details of everyday life, criticizing the debauchery of morals and asking for moral advice. In 1733, Aissa died of consumption.
Aysse’s letters to Mrs. Calandrini contain a lot of interesting information about the life of the French aristocracy of the Regency period, written in an elegant and at the same time simple syllable, marked by an uncompromising moral position, sincerity and frankness. The first edition (in 1787) was prepared by Voltaire; a commentary appeared in 1846. In 1985, the letters were translated into Russian and published in the series “Literary Monuments.”


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Summary of Aissa Sh