Summary Humphrey Clinker’s Journey

Summary Humphrey Clinker’s Journey

T. Smollett The
Journey of Humphrey Clinker
“Journey of Humphrey Clinker” – the last work of an English writer: the novel was published a few months before his death in Livorno, where Smollet voluntarily went to a kind of “exile.” The novel is written in an epistolary style, which was not an innovation for English literature; In this style, many novels by Richardson are also written. Novelty can be said to be the innovation of Smalllet in another: the same events, seen by the eyes of different people, with different views, belonging to a wide variety of estates, differing in cultural level, and finally in age, appear on the pages of these letters, different, sometimes very polar. And, above all, this is what strikes in the novel: an amazing disagreement,

Smollet’s ability to convey not only the difference in style and language, but also the total dissimilarity in the perception of life, level of thinking. His characters are revealed in their messages with such a human identity, so unexpectedly and paradoxically that one can rightfully talk about the true virtuosity of Smalllet – a psychologist, stylist, philosopher. The letters of his characters fully confirm the thesis: style is a person.
Smalllet always finds, as befits a “classic novel,” several layers. The plot is often replete with all sorts of branches, waste from the chronological exposition, the purpose of which for the author is to fully represent the picture of the epoch. Roman can literally be called an “encyclopedia of British life.” Being a genre, first of all, a novel-journey, whose characters cross the whole of Great Britain, it is a kaleidoscope of events, a string of destinies, pictures of the life of the capital, everyday life “on the waters” in Bath, the quiet existence of provincial towns and English nature, all kinds of entertainments of different layers of society, sketches of court morals and, of course, the features of the literary and theatrical environment and much, much more.
The main character of the novel is not at all identified in the title
by Humphrey Clinker (he appears on the pages when a third of the narrative is already behind), and Matthew Bramble, an elderly bachelor, gout and misanthrope, a man for all his jaundice (as a rule, however, absolutely justified) generous, unselfish and noble, in a word, a true gentleman; as his nephew Jerry Melford says, “in the generosity of his true Don Quixote.” In this image, Smetlet’s cuter ego is undoubtedly read, and it is Bramble who expresses the views closest to the author – on the state of minds, on the development of civilization, it should be noted, very accurate, accurate and, most importantly, completely not obsolete. So, in a letter to his permanent addressee, Dr. Lewis (and it should be noted that each of the characters has his own regular correspondent, on the pages of the novel that does not really appear, only in mentions), he writes: “There is one question that I would like to solve: did the world always deserve such contempt, which, in my opinion, it deserves now?” The question is, what to say, “for all time.”
However, with all the observance and insight, for all the sarcasm of Smallt (the Swift traditions are palpable in his novel, as well as in many other books written by contemporaries), he still tries everything that he hates so much (because he is hateful that it is too well known, and not from other people’s words), to oppose some kind of idyll, a kind of utopia. Such an Arkady, enticing, but clearly unattainable, is the Bramble Brambleton-Hall estate, of which we learn from the letters so many miracles, but where the heroes of the narrative never reach.
However, in the course of their journey, they truly know the world, discover the nature of people, the uniqueness of manners. As always, on the way they meet a lot of the most colorful personalities: “noble robber” Martin, an old soldier, all wounded and chopped, Lieutenant Lismahago. By nationality he is a Scotsman – which is the reason for the many discussions about England and Scotland (the characters at that moment just across Scotland and passing by). In so persistent a return to national themes, undoubtedly, the Scottish origin of Smollet himself, which was very palpable for him during his first steps in London, affected, of course, the consequences of this origin, of course, did not have the best effect. However, in that interpretation of Scotland, which is embedded in the novel in the mouth of Bramble, along with true observations there is also naivety, and the apparent idealization of the traditions, the national foundations of the Scots, for example, is opposed to the Scottish moral purity by the general depravity of the English, the peculiarities of the inhabitants of the capital – London, the loss of their roots. Lieutenant Lismahago is not only a participant in the discussion, but also, one might say, the spring of one of the plot lines: it is he who eventually becomes the chosen one and the husband of Sister Bramble Tabitha, a grumpy old maid who during the novel delivers many troubles and troubles to its participants.
Let us return to the hero of the novel, whose name appears in the title. During the journey on the carriages of the carriage, in which Mr. Bramble is seated, his sister Miss Tabitha, as well as the maid Jenkins, who holds the greatest jewel on her knees on a special pillow – Miss Tabitha’s favorite dog “cheesy dog” Chauder, an unfamiliar young man appears by chance mind – a real ragamuffin. His name is Humphrey Clinker. Later it turns out that he is an illegitimate, foundling, raised in a shelter (the paraphrase of Fielding “Tom Jones, the foundling”, but the paraphrase is distinctly parodic, which affects both Humphrey’s description of the appearance, and in the list of his “skills”, and in everything else). Generous Bramble, seeing that the young man is left to the mercy of fate, hires him to his service. He shows a sincere zeal of a sufficiently idiotic property, why all the time gets into ridiculous situations. However, upon arrival in London in Humphrey unexpectedly revealed quite a different talent: he turns out to be a wonderful… a preacher who knows how to bewitch a popular audience, and quite notable people. A footman reading a sermon to the Duchesses, such a Bramble can not tolerate. He is ready to expel Humphrey: “Either you are a hypocrite and a rogue, or possessed, and your brains are damaged!” Meanwhile, Humphrey is more “possessed,” or rather, foolish, with tears, admits to the master that this path was made possible by the “pious” hypocrite Lady Briskin, who convinced him that the spirit “descended upon him.” Having made sure that Humphrey is not a “rogue”, Bramble leaves him in his house. ” If there was pretension or hypocrisy in such excessive piety, I would not keep it in service, but, as I could see, this fellow is simplicity itself, inflamed by frenzy, and because of its simplicity, he is able to be faithful and affectionate to his benefactors ” as Bramble writes in the message to Dr. Lewis, but later, irritated by Humphrey’s impenetrable idiocy, Bramble expresses the opposite opinion: “Stupidity often infuriates more than cheating, and does more harm.” The moment when the carriage with Bramble and his households, moving across a stormy river, turns and everything, including Bramble, turns out to be in the water, it is Humphrey that saves his master. And already closer to the ending of the novel, the will of fate suddenly reveals that Humphrey Clinker’s father is none other than, As Bramble himself – “the sins of youth.” And Bramble says of his son: “This rogue is a wild apple tree, I myself planted…” What is the point? The simplicity of Humphry Clinker, often reaching idiocy, to frank foolishness (harmless only because Humphrey does not pursue any evil purposes consciously) is a continuation of the quixoticism of Bramble, a man of intelligent, subtle, noble sentiments and aspirations, all understanding, all knowing the price. ..
The second happy marriage, crowning the ending of the novel, is the wedding of Humphrey Clinker (now Matthew Lloyd) and the maid Winifred Jenkins: having grown fond of her when she was still a servant, Humphrey does not betray her even now, becoming a “master”. Commendable!
And the third happy union is connected with one more story, mentioned throughout the whole novel: the history of the niece of Bramble, the sister of Jerry Melford, Lydia. While still studying at the Oxford boarding school, she met a young man named Wilson, whom she passionately loved. But – he is an actor, a “comedian”, and therefore – “not a pair”. A certain shadow passes through the whole narrative, so that at the end it will be no actor, but a nobleman, and even the son of Mr. Bramble’s friend Mr. Dennison, according to Jerry Melford, “one of the most perfect young men in England.”
So – a triple idyll – this ends up is not an idyllic, but rather a bitter and very sober novel. As usual, Smollet brought to him a lot of real historical figures: the actor James Quinn, the attitude to which, in the time that has passed since the creation of “The Adventures of Perigrin Peacle,” has changed; known politicians, described with undisguised sarcasm and mockery; and even – himself, under the name of “writer S.”. He describes with pleasure the reception in his own home for various “writers”: bilious, disgusting, incompetent subjects, assiduously, “out of gratitude”, who are blaming their benefactor. “They all have one reason – envy,” – commented on this phenomenon, a friend of Jerry Melford Dick. Smollet describes what he knew better, than anything else: the life and mores of the literary underworld, of all sorts of writers who write dirty denunciations against each other, although they themselves do not cost a penny. But the conclusion to which Jerry comes in the finale is bitter enough, it also reflects the knowledge and experience of Smalllet himself: “I have given so much space to writers that you may suspect that I am going to join this brotherhood, but if I to this profession and was able, then it is the most hopeless means against starvation, for nothing can be put aside for old age or in case of illness. ” In conclusion, however, Jerry will write about the writers: “a wonderful breed of mortals whose morals… are very exciting.” And in these words, too, we will undoubtedly recognize the voice of Smalllet himself. all sorts of writers who write dirty denunciations on each other, although they themselves do not cost a penny. But the conclusion to which Jerry comes in the finale is bitter enough, it also reflects the knowledge and experience of Smalllet himself: “I have given so much space to writers that you may suspect that I am going to join this brotherhood, but if I to this profession and was able, then it is the most hopeless means against starvation, for nothing can be put aside for old age or in case of illness. ” In conclusion, however, Jerry will write about the writers: “a wonderful breed of mortals whose morals… are very exciting.” And in these words, too, we will undoubtedly recognize the voice of Smalllet himself. all sorts of writers who write dirty denunciations on each other, although they themselves do not cost a penny. But the conclusion to which Jerry comes in the finale is bitter enough, it also reflects the knowledge and experience of Smalllet himself: “I have given so much space to writers that you may suspect that I am going to join this brotherhood, but if I to this profession and was able, then it is the most hopeless means against starvation, for nothing can be put aside for old age or in case of illness. ” In conclusion, however, Jerry will write about the writers: “a wonderful breed of mortals whose morals… are very exciting.” And in these words, too, we will undoubtedly recognize the voice of Smalllet himself. to which comes in the final of Jerry, is bitter enough, it also reflected the knowledge and experience of Smalllet himself: “I have given so much space to writers that you can suspect that I’m going to join this brotherhood, but if I were to this profession and was is capable, then it is the most hopeless means against starving to death, because nothing can be put aside for old age or in case of illness. ” In conclusion, however, Jerry will write about the writers: “a wonderful breed of mortals whose morals… are very exciting.” And in these words, too, we will undoubtedly recognize the voice of Smalllet himself. to which comes in the final of Jerry, is bitter enough, it also reflected the knowledge and experience of Smalllet himself: “I have given so much space to writers that you can suspect that I’m going to join this brotherhood, but if I were to this profession and was is capable, then it is the most hopeless means against starving to death, because nothing can be put aside for old age or in case of illness. ” In conclusion, however, Jerry will write about the writers: “a wonderful breed of mortals whose morals… are very exciting.” And in these words, too, we will undoubtedly recognize the voice of Smalllet himself.


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Summary Humphrey Clinker’s Journey