James Daisy Miller in brief

James Daisy Miller in brief

A young American, Winterbourne, who has lived in Europe for many years and has become unaccustomed to American customs, comes to a small Swiss town of Vevey to see his aunt. In the hotel, he accidentally gets acquainted with the rich American family of Millers – a nine-year-old boy, his older sister and their mother. They travel through Europe accompanied by their agent and are going to go to Italy. The girl – Daisy Miller – strikes Winterbourne with her beauty, as well as with free and easy behavior that is not accepted in Europe. She talks without embarrassment to a strange man and captivates Winterbourne with her spontaneity. She talks about her family, about traveling with her mother and brother, about her future plans. She really likes in Europe, and she wants to see as many attractions as possible. The only thing that upsets her, – this is the absence of society, in America they traveled much more often, and she often visited men’s societies. Winterbourne is fascinated and puzzled; he never heard of young girls talking about themselves like that. He is trying to understand what is behind this strange behavior from the conventional point of view? He finds Daisy the definition: a pretty windy American, and rejoices to find a successful formula, Finding out that the girl was not yet in the Chillon castle and very much wants to visit him, Winterbourne suggests accompanying her. Frightened of his insolence, he adds that he will be happy to accompany

her and her mother, but neither his impertinence nor his respectfulness seems to produce the slightest impression on the girl. Finally confused by her equanimity, Winterbourne enjoys the opportunity to make this tour together with Daisy and promises to introduce the girl to her aunt. But when he talks to his princely relative about the family Miller, she says that she prefers to stay away from these vulgar and badly educated people. She is shocked by the fact that they treat their traveling agent as a close friend, her outrage at Daisy’s free behavior, and when she finds out that the girl is going to the Chillon Castle in the company of Winterbourne, barely familiar with her, flatly refuses to get acquainted with Millers. In the evening, Winterbourne meets Daisy in the garden, Despite the late hour, the girl walks alone and is happy to meet. Winterbourne is embarrassed: he does not know how to tell a girl about aunt’s refusal to get acquainted with her. He refers to the migraine that is tormenting her, but Daisy immediately guessed that this is not the case. However, this legibility in dating does not upset her at all, Winterbourne still can not understand whether the girl shows indifference or true indifference. They meet Mrs. Miller, and the girl quietly introduces her to Winterbourne, and then quietly announces that he is going to visit the Chillon Castle in his company. Winterbourne fears Mrs. Miller’s displeasure, but she takes this news quite calmly. Daisy says that he wants Winterbourne to ride her on the boat right now. Approached to them the agent of her parents and Mrs. Miller believe that this is indecent, but do not dare to contradict Daisy. Slightly teasing everyone, she declares: “That’s what I need – so that somebody gets a little worried!” – and goes home to sleep. Winterbourne is puzzled and ponders over the girl’s incomprehensible fads and unceremoniousness. Two days later he goes with Daisy to the castle of Chillon. In his opinion, in this escapade there is something bold, risky, he expects such an attitude and from Daisy, meanwhile the girl keeps quite calmly. In the castle of Chillon, she chats with Winterbourne about everything in the world, admires his education. She invites Winterbourne to go with them to Italy and take on the training of her brother Randolph and is very upset at having heard in response that he has other things to do and he will not only be unable to go with them to Italy, but a day or two must return to Geneva. Daisy suggests that there is a certain “charmer” waiting for Winterbourne and with a startling mix of ingenuity and tactlessness he begins to shower him with ridicule, saying that he will stop teasing him only if he promises to come to Rome in winter. Winterbourne is ready to promise it: his aunt rented a house in Rome, and he had already received an invitation to visit her there. But Daisy is unhappy: she wants Winterbourne to come to Rome, not for the sake of her aunt, but for her. When he tells his aunt that Daisy went with him to the castle of Chillon, she exclaims: “And with this person you were going to introduce me!”

In late January, Winterbourne arrives in Rome. Auntie informs him that Daisy appears in the company of a certain gentleman with refined manners and magnificent mustaches, which causes a lot of sense. Winterbourne tries to justify Daisy in the eyes of her aunt, assuring her that she is simple-minded and ignorant, nothing more. But the aunt thinks the Millers are horrendously vulgar, and their behavior is reprehensible. The information that Daisy is surrounded by “the owners of a magnificent mustache,” keeps Winterbourne from an immediate visit to her. He goes to visit Mrs. Walker, a familiar American who has been living in Switzerland most of the time, and she unexpectedly meets with the Miller family. Daisy reproaches him for not coming to see her. Winterbourne excuses himself, saying that he came only the day before. Daisy asks Mrs. Walker for permission to visit her for the evening with her close friend Mr. Giovanelli. Mrs. Walker does not dare to refuse her. Daisy is going to walk to the park in Pincio, where Giovanelli is already waiting for her. Mrs. Walker notices to her that a young girl is indecent to go there alone, and Daisy asks Winterbourne to accompany her. In the park, Winterbourne does not want to leave young people alone and walks with them, marveling that Daisy does not try to get rid of him. The combination in the girl of shamelessness and purity is a mystery to him. Mrs. Walker, believing that Daisy is ruining her reputation, comes after her to the park, but Daisy resolutely refuses to leave his companions and sit down in her stroller. She does not see anything wrong in her behavior and does not understand why she should bring her freedom as a sacrifice to propriety. Winterbourne tries to convince Mrs. Walker that she is wrong, but Mrs. Walker believes that Daisy is compromising herself, dancing all evening with one partner, taking guests at 11 pm, etc. She advises Winterbourne to stop getting to know Daisy, but Winterbourne refuses. Three days later, Winterbourne arrives at the reception to Mrs. Walker. There he meets Mrs. Miller, and Daisy arrives at the twelfth hour in the company of Giovanelli. Winterbourne tries to reason with Daisy, explaining to her that the young girl should not flirt with young people. “And it seemed to me that flirting more to face unmarried girls than married ladies,” – retorts Daisy. She quietly secluded herself from Giovanelli in the window niche of the next room and spends almost all evening there. Mrs. Walker decides at last to show firmness, and when Daisy comes to her to say goodbye, turns to the girl’s back. Daisy is amazed and hurt, and at Winterboard, at the sight of this scene, the heart contracts. He often goes to the hotel where Millers stayed, but rarely finds them at home, and if he does, then in the company of Giovanelli. He tries to understand if Daisy is in love, and discusses his assumption with his aunt. The aunt quite admits the idea of ​​a marriage between her and Giovanelli, who seems to her a hunter for a dowry. Winterbourne begins to doubt the purity of Daisy and leans to the idea that her craziness is not so innocent. He’s trying to find out if Daisy is engaged to Giovanelli. Her mother says that she does not, but she herself is not sure. Daisy, during a casual meeting, tells Winterbourne that she is engaged, but then immediately abandons her words. Winterbourne can not understand in any way whether Daisy does not notice, that the whole society turned away from it, or, conversely, deliberately challenges others. A week later, Winterbourne went for a walk late at night and wandered off to the Coliseum, where he met Daisy with Giovanelli. He decides to leave, but Daisy calls to him. And then Winterbourne remembers how dangerous it is to walk here, for the air is full of poisonous miasms, and Daisy may get fever. He scolds Daisy and her companion for unreasonableness, Giovanelli excuses himself: he tried to dissuade his companion, but without success. Seizing the moment, Daisy asks if he believed Winterbourne that they are engaged to Giovanelli. Winterbourne answers evasively and in conclusion says that now it seems to him that this is not so important. Daisy leaves home, accompanied by Giovanelli, and Winterbourne finds out in two days that she is dangerously ill. Mrs. Miller tells him that, awakening from delirium, Daisy asked to tell him that she was not engaged to Giovanelli, and to ask if he remembers the trip to the castle of Chillon. A week later, Daisy dies. At the funeral, Giovannelli tells Winterbourne that he has never met such a beautiful and kind girl, such a pure innocent soul. The heart of Winterbourne shrinks with pain and anger. In the following year, Winterbourne thinks a lot about Daisy, his conscience torments him, because he was unfair to her. In fact, she appreciated respect for herself. He confesses to his aunt: “I could not mistake myself, I lived abroad for too long.” such a pure innocent soul. The heart of Winterbourne shrinks with pain and anger. In the following year, Winterbourne thinks a lot about Daisy, his conscience torments him, because he was unfair to her. In fact, she appreciated respect for herself. He confesses to his aunt: “I could not mistake myself, I lived abroad for too long.” such a pure innocent soul. The heart of Winterbourne shrinks with pain and anger. In the following year, Winterbourne thinks a lot about Daisy, his conscience torments him, because he was unfair to her. In fact, she appreciated respect for herself. He confesses to his aunt: “I could not mistake myself, I lived abroad for too long.”


James Daisy Miller in brief