“Dream of Makar” Korolenko in brief summary

“Dream of Makar” Korolenko in brief summary

Makar is the main character, a peasant. The author himself referred his work to “holy stories”. Written in the Yakut exile, the story is inspired by the real impressions of the young writer. But, calling in the original sketches of the hero Zakhar, Korolenko, obviously, it was not by chance that he changed his name to Makar – on him, according to the Russian saying, “all the bumps lie”; on the other hand, Korolenkovsky Makar lives exactly where the other folkloric Makar “calves did not drive.” Makar is a descendant of Russian peasants, a resident of the “remote village of Chalgan,” lost in the distant Yakut taiga. Separating himself from the “filthy Yakuts”, he in Russian says “little and rather bad”; “he

worked terribly, lived poorly, suffered hunger and cold,” drank a lot.

On Christmas Eve, after drinking and going to inspect his traps in the taiga – in the hope of catching a fox, Makar got lost and began to freeze. In a dream, he sees a widow of Ivan, who died four years ago, all his unappreciated life, and then turns up in court at the “old Toyon”, in which God is personified. Toyon begins to weigh the sins of Makar, and there are so many of them that Toyon tells him to give Makar as punishment to the church trapeznik for the geldings. But then “the son of the old Toyon” enters the hut and asks his father to let Makar “say something”. And Makar, suddenly feeling in himself the “gift of speech,” tells in detail about his life: “They chased him all his life!” The elder and the foremen, the assessors and the police officers demanded the filing, chased the priests, demanded a rugu, drove the need and hunger, drove frost and heat, rain and drought; chased the frozen land and the evil taiga! “His bitter tale is replaced by fury:” How could he still bear this terrible burden. “He hoped for a” better share “, by” now he stood at the end, and hope faded.. “From the story of Makar, old Toyon,” the old priest Ivan, “”

the young God’s workers, “and the scales where the sins of Makar were crying,” cried up taller and taller! “This story of Korolenko was extremely popular among contemporaries, and his allegorical background allowed to give different interpretations – both revolutionary in nature and destructive. Christian story and allows less dramatic interpretation: the circumstances suggest that Makar is not frozen in the forest, and has a dream otlezhivayas after drinking. His bitter story gives way to fury: “How could he bear this terrible burden up to now?” He hoped for a “better share”, by “now he stood at the end, and hope faded…” From the story of Makar, old Toyon, “the old priest Ivan,” “the young God’s workers”, wept, and the scales of the weeds where the sins of Makar were, “rose higher and higher!” This story Korolenko was extremely popular with his contemporaries, and his allegorical background allowed him to give various interpretations – both revolutionary character and purely Christian ones. The story also allows for a less dramatic interpretation: circumstances suggest that Makar did not freeze in the taiga, but sees a dream, lying down after drinking. His bitter story gives way to fury: “How could he bear this terrible burden up to now?” He hoped for a “better share”, by “now he stood at the end, and hope faded…” From the story of Makar, old Toyon, “the old priest Ivan,” “the young God’s workers”, wept, and the scales of the weeds where the sins of Makar were, “rose higher and higher!” This story Korolenko was extremely popular with his contemporaries, and his allegorical background allowed him to give various interpretations – both revolutionary character and purely Christian ones. The story also allows for a less dramatic interpretation: circumstances suggest that Makar did not freeze in the taiga, but sees a dream, lying down after drinking. “Now he stood at the end, and hope faded…” From the story of Makar, old Toyon, “the old priest Ivan,” “the young God’s workers,” cried, and the scales, where the sins of Makar were, “all rose higher and higher! “This story of Korolenko was extremely popular among his contemporaries, and his allegorical background allowed him to give various interpretations – both revolutionary and purely Christian. The story also allows for a less dramatic interpretation: circumstances suggest that Makar did not freeze in the taiga, and sees sleep, lying down after drinking. “Now he stood at the end, and hope faded…” From the story of Makar, old Toyon, “the old priest Ivan,” “the young God’s workers,” cried, and the scales, where the sins of Makar were, “all rose higher and higher! “This story of Korolenko was extremely popular among his contemporaries, and his allegorical background allowed him to give various interpretations – both revolutionary and purely Christian. The story also allows for a less dramatic interpretation: circumstances suggest that Makar did not freeze in the taiga, and sees sleep, lying down after drinking.


“Dream of Makar” Korolenko in brief summary