Summary Pamela, or Rewarded Virtue

Summary Pamela, or Rewarded Virtue

S. Richardson
Pamela, or Rewarded Virtue
Pamela, barely fifteen children, the daughter of a poor but virtuous married couple Andrews, informs in a letter to her parents that the noble lady, in whose service she spent the last few years of her life, died from a serious illness. Her nobility and kind attitude towards Pamela was expressed not only in the fact that she taught the girl to read and count, but also did not forget about her future on her deathbed, having entrusted the care of Pamela to her son. The young gentleman so sympathetically reacted to the girl that gave her a considerable sum for the peasant daughter – four gold guineas and silver – which she now gives to her parents so that they can pay off at least some of the debts. In addition, he deigned to read her letter to make sure there were no mistakes (in the future, the owner began to “hunt” for the letters, because he did not want to, that the naive girl was enlightened, having interpreted the true meaning of his signs of attention). And since the young Esq. Kept Pamela by the hand and offered to use the library of his deceased mother later, the naive girl was assured of his infinite kindness. From the parents’ answer it followed that the courtesy and generosity of the young gentleman were extremely alarming, and they urged Pamela to follow only the path of virtue. Spouses Andrews, having consulted with one very worthy lady about the behavior of the young master, ask

the daughter to remember that the doors of their house are always open to her, if she considers that her honor is in the least danger. In subsequent letters, the girl speaks of the kind attitude of all those living in the house to herself. So, the visiting sister of the host – Lady Divers, noticing the beauty of Pamela, gives her good advice – to keep men at a distance. The kind lady, besides this, promised to take the young beauty to her house. The same thoughts, at the instigation of his master, inspired Pamela and other inhabitants of the house. Only then it became clear that, allegedly caring about the goodwill of the girl, Mr. B. thinks only of his interests, far from preserving maiden’s honor. The girl does not miss a single detail of her relationship with the master and other servants in the house. Parents learn about the gifts of Mr. B. – dresses, linens, handkerchiefs (a rarity in the life of even wealthy people of those times) and even aprons from the Dutch canvas. The admiration of the young servant by his master was replaced by alertness, and then with fear, after Mr. B. had ceased to conceal his intentions. Pamela remembered the proposal of Lady Devers and wanted to move to her house, but the host, whose admiration finally passed, categorically opposed, while the falsity of his arguments was obvious. The bitterest fears of the parents were confirmed. The young master had long ago, during his mother’s lifetime, paid attention to the charming servant and decided to make her his mistress. Pamela’s letters began to disappear, and the owner and his servants tried to convince Pamela that she should not correspond with her parents, under the ridiculous pretext that she was harming Mr. B.’s family, telling her relatives about what was happening. Therefore, many details of what happened to her are not captured in letters, but in a diary. drew attention to the lovely servant and decided to make her his mistress. Pamela’s letters began to disappear, and the owner and his servants tried to convince Pamela that she should not correspond with her parents, under the ridiculous pretext that she was harming Mr. B.’s family, telling her relatives about what was happening. Therefore, many details of what happened to her are not captured in letters, but in a diary. drew attention to the lovely servant and decided to make her his mistress. Pamela’s letters began to disappear, and the owner and his servants tried to convince Pamela that she should not correspond with her parents, under the ridiculous pretext that she was harming Mr. B.’s family, telling her relatives about what was happening. Therefore, many details of what happened to her are not captured in letters, but in a diary.
Pamela was ready to leave immediately. The housekeeper, Mrs. Jarvis, unable to persuade the girl to stay, volunteered to accompany her as soon as she could find the time. The girl postponed her departure. Over time, she began to feel that her piety and modesty had softened the cruel heart of Mr. B., since he not only agreed to release her, but also gave her a road coach and coachman to accompany her to the place where Pamela was to meet her father. The girl collected all the things ever given her by the late mistress and the young gentleman, so that the housekeeper checked the contents of her nodules. She herself changed into the simple peasant dress she had once arrived in Bedfordshire. Mr. B., who overheard the conversation of both women, took advantage of the situation, accusing the girl of stealing, hoping thereby to keep Pamela with him. Later the girl learns about other dishonest deeds of Esq., For example about the fate of Miss Sally Godfrey, seduced by Mr. B.
Pamela’s diary allows you to find out all the details of how she was in the hands of the former innkeeper – Mrs. Juks, Mrs. B.’s housekeeper at his Lincolnshire estate. On the way from Bedfordshire (it was there began the story of Pamela) to the place of a meeting with her father, the girl was forced to stop at a tavern, where her arrival was already awaited by an angry woman. She did not hide that she follows the instructions of her master Mr. B. Vainly looking for Pamela protection from neighbors and all those who seemed to appreciate her piety and modesty. No one wanted to speak out in her defense, fearing revenge of the rich and therefore all-powerful Esq. Those who dared to support it, such as the young pastor – Mr. Williams, were persecuted and persecuted. He was in correspondence with Pamela and was ready to help the girl at any cost. Jux informed the owner of all the plans of Pamela and the pastor. The priest was first subjected to a brutal attack, and then was arrested on false charges for failure to pay the debt. To prevent a possible escape of Pamela, the hard-hearted Jooks took all the money from the girl, took out her shoes for a day, and at night she laid her bed between herself and the maid. One can only imagine the grief of the father who did not find his daughter at the agreed place. Later Mr. B. wrote to the girl’s parents and, without concealing his intentions, offered money to his father and mother for his daughter. One can only imagine the grief of the father who did not find his daughter at the agreed place. Later Mr. B. wrote to the girl’s parents and, without concealing his intentions, offered money to his father and mother for his daughter. One can only imagine the grief of the father who did not find his daughter at the agreed place. Later Mr. B. wrote to the girl’s parents and, without concealing his intentions, offered money to his father and mother for his daughter.
About the state of mind of John Andrews, Pamela’s father, we learn from the author’s reasoning, which preceded the girl’s diary. Being locked up, Pamela remains to rely only on God’s help, and she does not stop praying. But a new misfortune awaits her – returning from her trip to Switzerland, a young owner appears in Lincolnshire and directly suggests the girl to become his mistress, believing that the money and material well-being of her family will force the young creature to yield to his harassment. Pamela. remains unshakable, and no temptations can turn it away from the true path and the piety inherent in it. The insidious seducer, struck by her nobility, suggests Pamela to become her husband. Even the threats of the sister (Lady Devers) to interrupt him with any kind of relationship, if he marries a commoner, do not frighten the young nobleman who embarked on a worthy path. He tries to correct the damage done to them, and instructs the wedding ceremony to hold the priest Williams – the only one who ventured to protect the innocent girl. The first part of the novel is another author’s argument about the benefits of piety and loyalty to moral duty.
In the second, third and fourth parts of the novel, Pamela still conducts extensive correspondence, but already as Mrs. B. Ottsu, the heroine tells in detail about all, even minor events in her life, quarrels and reconciliation with her husband, joys, visits. She describes in detail the characters, habits and toilets of all those with whom we have to meet. Most of all, she wants to share her observations about how her husband is changing for the better. Parents give her instructions on the duty and responsibilities of a married woman. The husband’s sister admires Pamela’s style and reasoning, constantly asks the young woman to describe in detail the various episodes of her life in her mother’s house. She can not hide her surprise and admiration for the fact that Pamela managed to forgive her abusers, first of all Mrs. Juks (who even attended the wedding of the girl and now also writes to her). Mrs. B. told her sister-in-law that the Christian duty does not allow her to refuse help to anyone who has taken the path of correction. Debt makes her do everything to warn a lost soul from despondency and prevent it from returning to its previous vicious life. Later, they exchange views on the upbringing of children sent to each other gifts, are consulted in various everyday affairs.
The novel ends with the author’s (in all digressions Richardson calls himself a publisher) a conclusion about the circumstances of the life of the heroes who did not enter into the correspondence or diary. The couple Andrews (the parents of the heroine) lived twelve years on their farm in contentment and peace and died almost simultaneously.
Lady Dovers, after the death of her husband, settled in Lincolnshire, next to the happy family of her brother and lived a very long time.
Mr. B. became one of the most respected people in the country, stayed for a while in the civil service, then retired from business, settling with his family, and met an old age, surrounded by universal respect for his always kindness and compassion.
Pamela became the mother of seven children who grew up surrounded by the love and tenderness of their parents.


Summary Pamela, or Rewarded Virtue