Summary of Giacomo Puccini. Girl from the West

Summary of Giacomo Puccini. Girl from the West

GIRL WITH THE WEST

Opera in three acts

Libretto by G. Civiniani and K. Tsangarini

Characters:

Minnie, the owner of the bar on the hill

Jack Ranch, sheriff

Dick Johnson (Ramerets)

Nick, the waiter “Polka”

Ashby, the agent of the transport company

Soprano

Baritone

Tenor

Tenor

Bass

Baritone

Tenor

Baritone

Baritone

Tenor

Tenor

Baritone

Bass

Bass

Mezzo soprano

Baritone

Bass

Tenor

Sonora

Trin

Sid

Bello

Harry

Joy

Happie

Larkens

}

Gold prospectors

Billy Jacrebit, an Indian

Walkley, his wife

Jack Uelech

Jose Castro, half-breed, from the gang of Ramerets

Postman

Gold prospectors.

The action takes place in California in 1849-1850.

HISTORY OF CREATION

In 1905, in New York, Puccini attended the premiere of David Belasco’s drama “A Girl from the Golden West.” The play made a great impression on him. Just at that time the composer was looking for a plot for a new opera; “The Girl from the Golden West” attracted his attention with

the harsh romantic color of semi-civilized California during the “gold rush” that swept her. Puccini planned to create an opera in which music would be embodied images that are close to the heroes of Bret Garth and typical of a whole stage of American life. The poets K. Tsangarini (born in 1874) and G. Chivinini (1873-1954) undertook the libretto for Belasco’s drama. In 1910 the creation of the opera was completed. The premiere of “Girls from the West” was held December 10, 1910 in New York under Toscanini. Johnson’s party was performed by Caruso. The performance was a triumphant success. On the stages of Soviet theaters the opera is titled “The Girl from California”.

MUSIC

“Girl from the West” is marked by the rapid development of the action, bright theatricality, freshness of the musical language and orchestral palette. Although sometimes she sins with melodramatism and external effects, in general, opera, of course, is dominated by virtues.

The introduction concentrates the lyrical mood of the opera. The first act is a widely developed genre and everyday stage. Solo replicas alternate with ensembles, recitative phrases – with brief exclamations. Plug-in number – melancholy melancholy song of Uelech “Remembering me, mother’s mother loses sleep” – is sustained in the national spirit. Great dramatic incandescence is reached by subsequent mass scenes. The turning point comes at the time of Minnie’s release, when a lyrical theme appears in the orchestra, drawing her captivating look. The scene of Minnie and Rancha at first is reserved, muffled dark; then the Party Rench acquires a lyrical coloring (“Minnie, his own home…”), and in Minny’s speeches tranquility reigns (“Love is much more expensive…”). In the scene of Minnie, Johnson and Ranch, the leading role is played by the orchestra; he conveys the inner excitement of Minnie and Johnson, whose recitative phrases are apparently indifferent. Sounds waltz-boston variety plan, it is superimposed vile replicas of Rencha (“I am the sheriff of the whole district… I do not laugh…”), exclamations of the choir. Carefree dance rhythm is replaced by a gloomy march, against which the scene of gold miners with the bandit Castro is unfolding. The scene of the explanation of Minnie and Johnson, starting in calm lyrical tones (“Mr. Johnson, you are here”), to the conclusion of the act reaches a tremendous emotional strain. Carefree dance rhythm is replaced by a gloomy march, against which the scene of gold miners with the bandit Castro is unfolding. The scene of the explanation of Minnie and Johnson, starting in calm lyrical tones (“Mr. Johnson, you are here”), to the conclusion of the act reaches a tremendous emotional strain. Carefree dance rhythm is replaced by a gloomy march, against which the scene of gold miners with the bandit Castro is unfolding. The scene of the explanation of Minnie and Johnson, starting in calm lyrical tones (“Mr. Johnson, you are here”), to the conclusion of the act reaches a tremendous emotional strain.

A brief orchestral introduction to the second act is endowed with an exotic tart color, designed to characterize the Indians. The same severe archaic sounds remain in the scene of Billy and Walkley (“Cream and biscuits to the hostess”). The scene of Minnie and Johnson (“Oh, how beautiful you are”) conquers with wide melodic breath, sincerity and emotional fullness. With the advent of gold diggers, disturbing colors arise in music. Johnson’s mournful arioso “Let me just say a word” is accompanied by melodic rhythmic turns of the funeral march.

The conversation between Rench and Nick (“I assure you, sheriff”) sounds against a background of single, as if stale chords. The ensemble ensemble scenes are of an excited character. Arioso Johnson “Let her believe” full of despair and sorrow. In the Minnie scene with gold diggers, deeply dramatic intonations are replaced by plaintive, affectionate-praying – passionate. The final duet of Minnie and Johnson “Farewell, beautiful homeland, goodbye, my California”, accompanied by the choir is an enlightened, pacified character.


Summary of Giacomo Puccini. Girl from the West