Summary Atta Trol

Summary Atta Trol

Heinrich Heine
Atta Troll
This poem by Heinrich Heine tells of a bear named Atta Troll. The action begins in 1841 in a small resort town Cotare in the Pyrenees, where the lyrical hero rested with his wife Matilda, whom he affectionately calls Juliet. Their balcony went out just to the city square, and they could watch every day how two bears dance on a chain of a bear cub – Atta Troll and his wife Mumma.
But this did not last long. One day the bear Atta Troll broke off the chain and fled to the mountains, into the den to his cubs – four sons and two daughters. He told them about his acting life and about how bad all people are. One day, Atta Troll brought his youngest son to the Stone of Blood, the ancient altar of the Druids, and there he swore an oath of

eternal hatred for people.
But in the meantime, the lyrical hero is going to hunt for a bear, along with a certain Laskaroo son of the witch Uraki, who actually died a long time ago, but the witch infiltrated his dead body with the appearance of life. Traveling several days on the mountains, they reached the hut of Uraki, which stands on steeper, above the “Gorge of Spirits.” Officially it was believed that Uraka was engaged in selling mountain herbs and stuffed birds. There was a stench from the grass in the shack, and the heads of the dead birds on the walls drew horror on the lyrical hero. And at night, to get rid of this horror, he opened the window, because he wanted to get some fresh air. And what did he see?
It was a full moon, the night of St. John, when spirits rush through the ravine to hunt. This picture was observed by the lyrical hero from the window. In the cavalcade he saw three beauties: the goddess Hunter Diana, the fairy of the North Abundu and the wife of King Herod Herodias with the head of John the Baptist on a platter. Herodias most liked the lyrical hero, because, flying past him, looked at him languidly and suddenly nodded. Three times the cavalcade flew past him along the gorge, and Herodias was nodded to him three times. Know for good! And then the lyrical hero fell asleep on the straw,
because in the house of the witch there were no featherbeds.
The next morning the lyrical hero, along with Lascaro, went for a walk to the valley, and while Lazcaro studied the tracks of the bear, he himself was immersed in thoughts of three night beauties. All day they wandered the mountains, like Argonauts without Argo. A terrible downpour began, and at night, tired and angry, they returned to the house of Uraki. She, sitting by the fire, scratched the pug, but then she stopped doing it, only saw the exhausted travelers. She shared a lyrical hero and laid him to sleep on the straw, and then she partitioned her son Laskaro and laid him, half-naked, on her lap. Before her stood the pug on the hind legs and held potion with potions in the front paws. From the pot took Uraka fat and smeared his son’s chest and ribs. And the lyrical hero was again frightened of the dead Lascaro, the smell of potions and stuffed birds, hanging here and there on the walls. For fear he fell asleep.
He woke up at noon. Uraka and Lazcaro went hunting the bear, and the lyrical hero remained in the hut alone with a thick pug. Pug stood on his hind legs at the hearth and cooked something in the kettle, and then he spoke to himself in the Swabian language. He told himself that in fact he was an unfortunate Swabian poet, bewitched by a witch. Hearing about this, the lyrical hero asked him how it could have happened that the witch bewitched him. It turned out that walking in the mountains, he accidentally ended up in the shack with the witch, who immediately fell in love with him, and when she realized that he did not respond to her feelings because of her notorious Swabian morality, she immediately turned him into a pug. But it can be disgraced if a virgin can read the poems of the Swabian poet Gustav Pfitser alone on New Year’s Eve and not fall asleep. The lyrical hero told the pug that it is impossible. At the same time, when the lyrical hero was talking to a pug, Atta Troll slept in his lair among the children. Suddenly he woke up, anticipating his imminent death, and told her about it to his children. Suddenly he heard the voice of his beloved wife Mumma and ran to her call. It was then that he shot down Laskaro, who was hiding in the distance. The fact is that the witch lured the bear out of the den, very skillfully imitating the grumbling of the bear, So Atta Troll died, and his last sigh was about Mumma. It was then that he shot down Laskaro, who was hiding in the distance. The fact is that the witch lured the bear out of the den, very skillfully imitating the grumbling of the bear, So Atta Troll died, and his last sigh was about Mumma. It was then that he shot down Laskaro, who was hiding in the distance. The fact is that the witch lured the bear out of the den, very skillfully imitating the grumbling of the bear, So Atta Troll died, and his last sigh was about Mumma.
The body of the bear was dragged to the town hall, where the assistant to the mayor acted. He told the audience about the problems of beetroot, and also praised the heroism of Lazcaro, why the dead Lascaro even blushed and smiled.
And the bear was taken off the skin, and one day it was bought by the wife of the lyrical hero Matilda, whom he affectionately calls Juliet. The hero himself often walks barefoot on the night.
As for the bear Mummy, she now lives in the Paris Zoo, where she endlessly surrenders to love joys with a hefty Siberian bear.


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Summary Atta Trol