Summary of the story of M. Gorky’s “The Blue Life”

Meshchanin Constantine Mironov lives in a remote provincial town. When he was a child, his parents drank and often scandalized. At the same time, the mother was a religious person and went on a pilgrimage to the monastery. My father was an oddball. For example, he amused himself by attaching wooden pipes with rubber balls to the doors, which whistled when the door opened. In general, the father tried to “drown out” the boredom of life with different sounds: he listened to a music box that his mother once broke in his heart, then brought home a globe that, turning around the axis, played a “chizhika-pyzhik” … Before his father, the mother was married to his boss, who shot his father from the gun. “My woe, that he did not kill you!” Mother often cried to her father.
Konstantin Mironov – also an eccentric and a dreamer. He dreams of going to Paris. He has never been abroad, and therefore he imagines Paris a city where everything is decidedly blue: both the sky, and people, and houses. The dream of Paris and its “blue life” brightens the boredom of the provincial city, but also...

disrupts Mironov’s connection with reality. People start to notice something strange in him and shun him.
The first signs of insanity are felt when Mironov decides to paint his house in blue, in order to at least partially realize the dream. The house is painted by a strange man – Carpenter, which is a bit like a boring provincial feature. Instead of a blue paint, he uses blue, and the result is monstrous, especially since the yellow paint Stolyar draws on the facade of some creature, remotely resembling a fish. The townspeople perceive this as a challenge to them, for no one paints their houses in a similar color.
At the same time, Mironov falls in love with Lisa Rozanov, the daughter of a respected man in the city. But he again “thinks up” the object of his love: Lisa is an ordinary little bitch, she does not understand the romantic dreams of Mironov.
In the end, Mironov goes insane. He is cured by a local doctor, and Mironov becomes an ordinary binder of books, moderately business-like, moderately greedy, etc. A narrator meets him, to whom he tells the story of his madness.


Summary of the story of M. Gorky’s “The Blue Life”