Summary of the Hunter’s Notes: The Chorus and Kalinych

IS Turgenev
Notes of the hunter: Chor and Kalinich
The story begins with the author’s reasoning about how and how people who live in Orel province and Kaluga differ. “The Orel man is small in height, stooped, sullen, looks slyly, lives in crooked aspen groves, goes to the corvee, does not trade in trade, eats badly, wears bast shoes, Kaluga vengeance man lives in spacious pine huts, tall, looks boldly, cheerfully, face is clean and white, trades in oil and tar and on holidays wears boots. ” Compare the appearance of the settlements (also not in favor of Orel village).
In terms of hunting Kaluga province is also better. As a hunter visiting the Zhizdrinsky district, the author got acquainted with one Kaluga landlord – Polutykin. The landowner was eccentric, had his own weaknesses, but was distinguished by hospitality. On the first day he invited the author to spend the night at his estate. However, before the estate was far away, so at first Polutykin suggested going to Khor, one of his men.
The landlord with the guest goes to the settlement, but Khorya is not at home. They see only the hut, in which there is nothing superfluous (there is only an image, a lamp, the necessary furniture). In the hut there are six children of Khorya of different ages. Without waiting for the owner, the guests leave. Over dinner, the author asks Polutykina why the Chor lives on his own, and he says that about 25 years ago Khor’s house in the village burned down and he came to Father Polutikin with a request to move him to the swamp, to the settlement, promising for such permission to pay a good one the obrok. Polutykin Sr. agreed and put Horia payback 50 rubles. He led the economy as befits, became rich and now pays already as much as 100 rubles to pay. Polutykin said that he was even going to “throw on”. Polutykin repeatedly suggested that Khorya pay off, but he refused, referring to the fact,
The next day the author and Polutykin again go hunting. Polutykin peeks into one of the huts and takes with him a peasant, Kalinich, a peasant of about forty, tall, thin. Kalynych, as everyone in the district speaks of him, he is a very kind person. He is very careful about his master, looking after him as “for a small child,” respectfully – to the guest “serving him, but without servility.”
At noon, when the heat becomes particularly strong, Kalinych takes them to his apiary, treats him with fresh honey. During the conversation, Polutykin informs the author that although Kalynych is a kind, helpful and generous peasant, he can not keep the farm in good condition, since Polutykin distracts him all the time, then takes it with him for hunting, then for other needs.
The next day, Polutykin goes on business to the city. One author goes on a hunt, and on the way back he turns to Khorya. On the threshold of the hut he is met by an old man – bald, of short stature, broad-shouldered. It was the Chorus. To the author he reminds Socrates: “the same high cone, the same small eyes, the same snub nose”. Talking with Horem about different subjects (about sowing, about harvest, about peasant life), the author notes that he is “on his mind”. So, for example, when asked why he will not pay off the master, Hor does not answer directly, but at the same time he makes it clear that he is calmer after the master, since he knows his master and knows his obrok.
The author stays for the night in the hayloft near Khor, and in the morning, at breakfast, he notes that everything... in the family of Khorya is a tall, healthy people. The author is surprised why all children, even adults, with their own families, live with Horem. He replies that no one is unwilling, that they “want it themselves, and they live”. Only one of his sons is not married, Fedya. The chorus tries to persuade his son to marry, but to Fedya’s question, why should he marry and “what’s in a good woman”, Horus explains. “Baba is an employee, a woman is a servant to a peasant.”
Suddenly, Kalinych comes to see Horya. He brings in a bunch of field strawberries and gives it to his friend Horia. The author is surprised at the presence of such “tenderness” in the peasant. The author goes on a hunt and simultaneously reflects on two seemingly opposite, but complementary characters of Khory and Kalinych. The chorus was “a positive, practical, administrative person, a rationalist,” Kalinych, on the other hand, was one of “idealists, romantics, enthusiastic and dreamy people.” The chorus understood the reality, he settled down, saved up money, got along with the master and other authorities. Kalynych walked in bast shoes and interrupted somehow. The choir has built a large family, submissive and unanimous. Kalinich had once had a wife whom he feared, but there were no children at all. The chorus saw right through Mr. Polutykin, Kalinich reverenced his master. The chorus spoke little, chuckled, was “on my mind”. Kalinych spoke with fervor, although “and did not sing like a nightingale, like a smart factory man.” Kalinich also had some advantages that Khorya did not (which the Chorus himself recognized): for example, he spoke blood, fear, rabies, drove worms, bees were given to him.
The chorus personally asked Kalinich to bring the horse he had just bought to the stables, which he did. Kalinych seemed to be closer to nature, and the Chorus – to people and society. Kalynych did not like to talk and believed blindly. The chorus rose even to an ironic outlook on life. He saw a lot, he knew a lot. The chorus is keenly interested in the new – after learning that the author has been abroad, he asks about the administrative and state customs and customs there. Kalynych, on the contrary, was more interested in descriptions of nature, mountains, waterfalls. The author concludes that “Peter the Great was primarily a Russian man, the Russian in his own transformations.” The Russian man is so confident of his strength and strength that he does not mind and break himself, he does not take much interest in his past and boldly looks ahead. he likes it, that is reasonable – that’s what he should give, and where it comes from, – he does not care. His common sense willingly teases the lean German mind; but the Germans, according to Khor, a curious people, and learn from them, he is ready. “
Despite extensive knowledge and erudition, Chor, in contrast to Kalinich, could not read. Bab Chor despised “from the depths of the soul” and “in a merry hour he played and mocked them.” The chorus often teased Kalynych that he did not know how to live, and that even a boot can not try to get himself from the master. Kalinych had a good voice and often sang. The chorus eagerly sang along with him. Kalinich in the apiary was very clean (otherwise the bees would not have lived), the Chore of special purity did not adhere.
The chorus asks if the author has an estate, and when he answers what he has, but he does not live there, but “more with ruzhishkom”, Horus says “well, right, father do.” Shoot yourself to the health of black grouses and the elder elderly change frequently “.


Summary of the Hunter’s Notes: The Chorus and Kalinych