“Hero of our time” Lermontov in brief summary

30-ies of the last century. The conquest of the Caucasus, which knew much more “stormy days” under Alexei Petrovich Ermolov, is drawing to a close. “Foreign forces”, of course, are burdened by “the land of holy liberty,” and, of course, he is indignant, but not so much as to block the Military-Georgian road. The author, the officer of Russian colonial troops, and the veteran of the Caucasian War, Captain-Maksim Maksimych, meet on her. To Vladikavkaz, where our soldiers are keeping their way, not too far away, but ice and a sudden storm are forcing them to stop twice for the night. Under the gull from the cast-iron kettle Maxim Maksimych and tells the curious, like all writing and recording people, a fellow traveler a real incident from his life.

This is now the 50-year-old captain-captain is considered to be someone like an intendant, and five years ago he was still a military officer-commandant of a fortress and stood with his company in the newly-bogged Chechnya. Of course, it happens, of course, every day – “every day danger” – but in general with the humble “savages”, the peacekeepers live in a neighborly manner, until Grigory Aleksandrovich Pechorin appears in the “boring” fortress, a brilliant guardsman transferred to the army and half-sent to the Caucasus for some sort of scandalous secular crime. After serving under Maxim Maximich for about a year, a twenty-five-year-old ensign, with such a thin and white face, manages to: put an eye on the pretty daughter of a local “peaceful” prince, with the help of his younger brother, Bela Azamat, to kill her from the house, tame, yourself to passion, and in about four months to figure out: the love of a savage is in no way better than the love of a noble lady. Maksim Maksimych is so simple, but he understands that Pechorin’s romantic enterprise is not going to end well. It ends really bad: the redistribution of stolen goods. The fact is that Pechorin is paying with Azamat not with his gold, but with someone else’s – an invaluable – a horse, the only asset of the dashing Kazbich. Kazbich, in revenge, kidnaps Bela and, realizing that the pursuit does not go away, stabs her.

The “storyteller” told by the staff captain would remain a travel episode in the “Notes on Georgia”, over which the author works, if not for a roadside surprise: after staying in Vladikavkaz, he becomes an eyewitness of an unintended meeting between Maxim Maksimych and Pechorin, who retired and is on his way in Persia.

Observing the former subordinate of the captain, the author, a remarkable physiognomist, convinced that one can judge by the features of a person the nature of a man, comes to the conclusion: Pechorin is a typical face, perhaps even a portrait of the hero of time, a life made up of the vices of a barren generation. In short: pulls on a super-modern, psychological novel, no less curious than “the history of the whole people.” In addition, he gets a completely unique document. Having frowned at Grigory Alexandrovich, Maxim Maksimych in a dithering manner passes on to the fellow traveler the “Pechorin papers” – a diary he forgot in the fortress with a hasty retreat to the ridge – to Georgia. Extracts from these papers are the central part of the “Hero of Our Time”.

The first chapter of this novel in the novel – the adventurous novel “Taman” confirms: the captain, with all his simple-heartedness, correctly felt the character of Bela’s killer: Pechorin is an adventurer, one of those senselessly active natures who are ready to sacrifice their lives a hundred times only would have to get the key to the mysterious mystery that intrigued them. Judge for yourself: three days on the road, he comes to Taman late at night, hardly arranges to stay – batman snores, and the master is not up to sleep. Hunting instinct and diabolical intuition are whispered: the blind boy who let him “on the fater” is not as blind as they say, and the fater – for nothing that the kosobokaya mazanka – is not like a family hut. The blind man behaves strangely for the blind: he descends to the sea on a steep slope “with a right tread,” and even drags a knot. Pechorin sneaks after him and, hiding behind a coastal cliff, continues his observation. In the fog, a female figure is designated. He listens, he guessed: two on the shore waiting for a certain Janko, whose boat should quietly get past the sentry vessels. The girl in white is worried – there is a strong storm on the sea, – but the courageous rower safely moors. Having loaded the brought bales on the shoulders, the trinity is removed. The riddle, which seemed to Pechorin intricate, is easier than easy: Yanko brings smuggled goods from behind the sea, and the girl and the blind help him hide and sell. With vexation, Pechorin makes a rash step: at point-blank range, with the old mistress, he asks the boy where he is dragging himself at night. Fearing that the guest “will inform” the military commandant, the girlfriend Janko decides to get rid of an excessively curious witness. Having noticed, that liked mimozzzhemu master, the little mermaid offers him a nightly, tet-a-tet, boat trip through the troubled sea. Pechorin, who can not swim, hesitates, but retreat before the danger – not in his rules. As soon as the boat sails for a sufficient distance, the girl, lulling the vigilance of the gentleman with fiery arms, cleverly throws overboard his gun. A fight is being tied up. The ship is about to overturn. Pechorin – stronger, but the sea maiden is flexible, like a wild cat; another cat throw – and our superman will follow his pistol into the oncoming wave. But all the same, the onard is overboard. Pechorin somehow picks up to the shore and sees that the little mermaid is already there. Appears Janko, dressed in a hiking, and then blind. Smugglers, confident that now, after an unsuccessful attempt, the officer will surely inform the authorities, inform the boy that they leave Taman for good. That tearfully asks to take him, but Yanko rudely denies: “What do I need you!” Pechorin becomes sad, he still feels sorry for the “poor miserable.” VYA, for a little while. Finding that the poor blind man had robbed him, unerringly choosing the most valuable things, he calls the thief “the damned blind.”

About what happened to Pechorin after leaving Taman, we learn from the story “Princess Mary”. On a punitive expedition against the Black Sea mountaineers, he acquainted with the cadet Grushnitsky, a provincial youth who joined the military service for romantic reasons: he spent winter in S., where he briefly met with Dr. Werner, a clever and skeptic. And in May and Pechorin, and Werner, and Grushnitsky, wounded in the leg and rewarded – for bravery – George Cross, already in Pyatigorsk. Pyatigorsk, like neighboring Kislovodsk, is famous for its healing waters, May is the beginning of the season, and the whole “water society” is assembled. The society is mostly male, officer – after all, and around the war, ladies – all in all. The most interesting of the “resort girls”, according to the general verdict, is Princess Mary, the only daughter of a rich Moscow lady. Princess Ligovskaya is an Englishman, so Mary knows English and reads Byron in the original. Despite his scholarship, Mary is direct and in Moscow is democratic. Instantly noticing that the wound prevents Grushnitsky from bending down, she lifts a glass with acidic – medicinal water – dropped by a cadet. Pechorin catches himself thinking that he envies Grushnitsky. And not because the Moscow young lady liked him so much – although, as a connoisseur, he fully appreciated her unconventional appearance, and a stylish manner to dress. And because he believes: all the best in this world should belong to him. In short, with nothing to do, he starts a campaign whose purpose is to win Mary’s heart and thereby hurt the pride of the arrogant and not-so-proud narcissistic Georgievsky chevalier Mary is direct and in Moscow is democratic. Instantly noticing that the wound prevents Grushnitsky from bending down, she lifts a glass with acidic – medicinal water – dropped by a cadet. Pechorin catches himself thinking that he envies Grushnitsky. And not because the Moscow young lady liked him so much – although, as a connoisseur, he fully appreciated her unconventional appearance, and a stylish manner to dress. And because he believes: all the best in this world should belong to him. In short, with nothing to do, he starts a campaign whose purpose is to win Mary’s heart and thereby hurt the pride of the arrogant and not-so-proud narcissistic Georgievsky chevalier Mary is direct and in Moscow is democratic. Instantly noticing that the wound prevents Grushnitsky from bending down, she lifts a glass with acidic – medicinal water – dropped by a cadet. Pechorin catches himself thinking that he envies Grushnitsky. And not because the Moscow young lady liked him so much – although, as a connoisseur, he fully appreciated her unconventional appearance, and a stylish manner to dress. And because he believes: all the best in this world should belong to him. In short, with nothing to do, he starts a campaign whose goal is to win Mary’s heart and thereby hurt the pride of the arrogant and not-so-proud narcissistic Georgievsky chevalier that he envies Grushnitsky. And not because the Moscow young lady liked him so much – although, as a connoisseur, he fully appreciated her unconventional appearance, and a stylish manner to dress. And because he believes: all the best in this world should belong to him. In short, with nothing to do, he...starts a campaign whose purpose is to win Mary’s heart and thereby hurt the pride of the arrogant and not-so-proud narcissistic Georgievsky chevalier that he envies Grushnitsky. And not because the Moscow young lady liked him so much – although, as a connoisseur, he fully appreciated her unconventional appearance, and a stylish manner to dress. And because he believes: all the best in this world should belong to him. In short, with nothing to do, he starts a campaign whose purpose is to win Mary’s heart and thereby hurt the pride of the arrogant and not-so-proud narcissistic Georgievsky chevalier

Both are quite possible. The scene at the “sour” source is dated 11 May, and after eleven days in the Kislovodsk “restaurant” at a public ball, he is already dancing with the Ligovskaya Junior, a waltz coming into fashion. Taking advantage of the freedom of resort morals, a dragoon captain, drunk and vulgar, tries to invite the princess to a mazurka. Mary is shocked, Pechorin deftly otshivaet dork and receives from a grateful mother – even more! saved her daughter from fainting at the ball! – an invitation to visit her house without ceremony. Meanwhile, the circumstances become more complicated. The distant relative of the princess comes to the water, in which Pechorin learns “his Faith,” a woman whom he once truly loved. Faith still loves her unfaithful lover, but she is married, and her husband, a rich old man, is unshakable, like a shadow: the princess’s living room is the only place where they can see each other, without causing suspicion. For the lack of girlfriends, Mary shares her cousin with heart secrets; Faith conveys them to Pechorin – “she is in love with you, poor thing” – he pretends that he does not take it at all. But the female experience tells Vera: a dear friend is not completely indifferent to the charm of a charming Muscovite. Being jealous, she takes with Grigory Alexandrovich the word that he will not marry Mary. And the reward for the sacrifice promises a true date. Impatient lovers are lucky: to Kislovodsk, where the “water society” has moved beyond the next batch of medical procedures, comes the famous magician and magician. The whole city, with the exception of Mary and Vera, is naturally there. Even the princess, despite her daughter’s illness, takes a ticket. Pechorin goes along with everyone, but, without waiting for the end, disappears “in English.” Grushnitsky with a friend dragoon persecute him and, noticing that Pechorin is hiding in the Ligovsky garden, they are ambushing. Catching Lovelace in the act, true, can not, but they raise the noise hefty – keep, they say, a thief!

In search of the robbers, I mean the Circassians, the Cossack detachment is urgently called to Kislovodsk. But this version is for the common people. The male part of the “water society” is pleased to relish Grushnitsky and his partner’s insidious insinuations against the princess. Pechorin, who has fallen into a false position, has nothing else to do but to bring the slanderer to a duel. Grushnitsky, on the advice of the second, offers to shoot “six steps”. And to protect themselves, allows the dragoon to leave the pistol of the enemy uncharged. Werner, by pure coincidence, had seen about the dishonest conspiracy, in horror. However, Pechorin cold-bloodedly – and strictly according to the rules of the dueling code – frustrates the fraudulent plan. The first, by lot, shoots Grushnitsky, but he is so excited that a “loyal” bullet only slightly offends his happy opponent. Before making a response – a fatal shot, Pechorin offers a former friend of the world. He, in a state almost insane, refuses flatly: “Shoot! I despise myself, but I hate you!” If you do not kill me, I’ll kill you round the corner! “

The death of the unlucky admirer of the princess does not relieve tension within the love quadrangle. Vera, hearing about the duel at six steps, ceases to control herself, her husband realizes the true state of things and urges to pawn the wheelchair urgently. After reading her farewell note, Pechorin jumps to his Cherkes. The thought of parting forever makes him terrified: only now he realizes that Faith is more precious to him than anything in the world. But the horse can not stand the wild leap – senseless race for the lost, ruined by happiness. Pechorin on foot returns to Kislovodsk, where he is waited with displeasing news: the authorities do not believe that Grushnitsky’s death is the tricks of the Circassians, and just in case he decides to send the surviving “fighter” far away. Before leaving Pechorin goes to Ligovsky to say goodbye. Princess, forgetting about propriety, offers him the hand of his daughter. He asks permission to speak with Mary privately and, remembering this vow, “You will not marry Mary?!”, – declares to the poor girl that he was dragging her out of boredom to laugh. Of course, in this vulgar, suitable, except for the petty-bourgeois stories, the formula of dislike of his feelings for Mary does not fit in any way. But he is a player, and the player is most important to keep a good face in a bad game. And with this – alas! – that’s that! Style is a person, and the style of life of our hero is such that he, seemingly unwilling, destroys all living things, wherever this living thing is found – in the mountain sazlak, in a miserable hog-house or in a rich gentry nest. that he was dragging her out of boredom to laugh. Of course, in this vulgar, suitable, except for the petty-bourgeois stories, the formula of dislike of his feelings for Mary does not fit in any way. But he is a player, and the player is most important to keep a good face in a bad game. And with this – alas! – that’s that! Style is a person, and the style of life of our hero is such that he, seemingly unwilling, destroys all living things, wherever this living thing is found – in the mountain sazlak, in a miserable hog-house or in a rich gentry nest. that he was dragging her out of boredom to laugh. Of course, in this vulgar, suitable, except for the petty-bourgeois stories, the formula of dislike of his feelings for Mary does not fit in any way. But he is a player, and the player is most important to keep a good face in a bad game. And with this – alas! – that’s that! Style is a person, and the style of life of our hero is such that he, seemingly unwilling, destroys all living things, wherever this living thing is found – in the mountain sazlak, in a miserable hog-house or in a rich gentry nest.

Officer Pechorin appears unwillingly and in the thrilling novel “Fatalist.” In the officer’s card company, gathered at the apartment of the head of the front-line garrison, a philosophical dispute is tied up. Some consider the Muslim belief – “as if the fate of man is written in heaven” – a real nonsense, others, on the contrary, are convinced: for every person a fatal minute is appointed. Lieutenant Vulich, born Serbian, and according to the location of the mind – fatalist, invites the disputants to participate in the mystical experiment. Say, if the hour of his death has not yet struck, then Providence will not allow the gun, which he, Vulich, prinarodno put with a barrel to his forehead, shot. To whom, gentlemen, you want to pay N-number of chervonets for a rare sight? Nobody, of course, does not like. In addition to Pechorin. This not only turns all the contents of his purse onto the playing table, but also tells Vulich – out loud, looking into your eyes: “You’re going to die today!” The first “round” of a dangerous bet wins the Serb: the pistol really does misfire, although it is completely normal, the next time the Lieutenant pierces through the wall cap of the owner hanging on the wall. But Pechorin, watching as the fatalist shifts his gold into his pocket, insists: Vulich’s face is a sign of a near death. Vulich, at first embarrassed, and then outraged, leaves. One. Not waiting for lingering comrades. Also perishes, not having reached the house: it is cut by a sword – from a shoulder to a belt – the drunk Cossack. Now those who did not believe in predestination believed. It never enters anyone’s head to imagine how the fateful line of the unfortunate lieutenant would unfold, if the blind case and the desire to change places did not bring Grigory Pechorin from a boring fortress, from under the supervision of Maxim Maksimych to the front-line Cossack village. Well, the officers would make a noise, the grim Serb would parrot them, and they would return to the cards thrown under the table, to the shtos and whist, and stayed until dawn – and there, you see, the sobered hopper would have sobered up. Even Maksim Maksimych, after listening to Pechorin’s story about the terrible death of poor Vulich, though he tried to do without metaphysics, he ended by agreeing with the general opinion: “It’s clear that he was written like that on the family.” With his own, a special opinion, only Pechorin remains, although he does not say aloud: but who among you, gentlemen, knows for sure whether he is convinced of what or not? Well, well, estimate – how often do each of you take for deception a deceit of feelings or a mistake of reason?

And in fact – who? Here, after all, Grigory Alexandrovich was convinced that he had written the demise from his wicked wife. And died – on the road, returning from Persia, with unexplained circumstances.


“Hero of our time” Lermontov in brief summary