Biography Maksimov Vladimir Emelyanovich

Biography Maksimov Vladimir Emelyanovich


(1930-1996)

Maksimov Vladimir Emelyanovich (1930 – 1996), the prose writer.
Born December 9 in Leningrad in the family of a peasant, planted in 1933 in prison as a “Trotskyite.” Maximov was homeless, then brought up in the children’s colonies, of which he ran six times.
He graduated from the FZO school (factory-factory training), received the profession of mason. Worked on construction sites; I was looking for diamonds on the Taimyr Peninsula.
From 1952 he worked in the Kuban, where he began to write. The first collection of poems and poems “The Generation on the Clock” was published in 1956.
Maximov declared himself as a writer of the narrative “A Man Is Alive”, printed by K. Paustovsky in the collection “The Tarusa Pages” in 1964. The collection was condemned by criticism, the editor was removed for “political myopia “.
In the 1970s he wrote novels “We Live the Earth” and “Seven Days of Creation”. These novels provoked such a barrage of condemnation that Maksimov was forced to emigrate (1973). In Paris he organized the magazine “Continent”, published in 11 languages. The magazine was conceived as a publication uniting the forces of resistance to a totalitarian system and ideology, and he fulfilled this role. At different times A. Solzhenitsyn, A. Sinyavsky, A. Sakharov, I. Brodsky and many other representatives of the creative intelligentsia collaborated in it.
In the West, Maximov’s novels “The Ark for the Uninvited”, “Quarantine”, “The Saga of Savva”, the publicistic “The Saga of the Rhinoceroses” were published. In the 1990s, Maximov’s novels were republished in Russia, and in 1991 his collected works were published in eight volumes.
In 1992 in the theater. V. Mayakovsky was staged Maximov’s play “Who’s Afraid of Ray Bradbury?”.
In 1990, the writer was returned to Soviet citizenship, which he was deprived after emigrating abroad.
In the last years of his life he often came to Russia and lived in Moscow for a long time, hoping for rapid democratic changes. Reality showed that hopes were premature. In Maximov’s speeches, pessimism and unbelief in the future of Russia were increasingly heard. In 1996, V. Maximov died.
A short biography from the book: Russian writers and poets. A short biographical dictionary. Moscow, 2000.



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Biography Maksimov Vladimir Emelyanovich