Biography Herzen Alexander Ivanovich

(1812 – 1870)

Herzen Alexander Ivanovich (pseudonym Iskander) (1812 – 1870). Russian politician, writer, philosopher, publicist. Born April 6 (in the old style – March 25), 1812 in Moscow. The illegitimate son of the noble Russian master IA Yakovlev and the German woman Louise Haag, whom Yakovlev, returning after a long journey through Europe, took with him to Moscow. To the child Yakovlev gave the name Herzen (from the German word “Herz” – the heart). The first years of the boy were depressed and lonely. He learned the German language from his mother, in conversations with his father and tutors – French. Yakovlev had a rich library consisting almost entirely of the writings of French writers of the eighteenth century, and in it the boy rummaged quite freely. The events of December 14, 1825 determined the direction of the aspirations and sympathies of Herzen. In 1833, Herzen graduated from the university with a degree of candidate and a silver medal. Even at university he got acquainted with the teachings of the Saint-Simonists. A year after the end of the course, Herzen and his friend Ogarev were arrested. The reason for the arrest was the very fact of the existence in Moscow of “non-servicemen”, always talking about something disturbing, agitated and boiling young people, and the occasion – a student’s party, which contained a “daring blame” song, and the bust of Emperor Nicholas Pavlovich. The inquiry found out that the song was composed by Sokolovsky, Sokolovsky was familiar with Ogarev, Hertzen is friends with Ogaryov, and although neither Herzen nor Ogarev were even at the party, however, based on “circumstantial evidence” about their “way of thinking,” they were brought to the case of “failed, due to arrest, conspiracy of young people devoted to the teachings of Saint-Simonism. “Herzen stayed in prison for nine months, after which, according to him,” we were read as a bad joke, a death sentence, and then announced that, driven so characteristic of him, impermissible kindness, the emperor ordered us to apply only a correctional measure, in the form of exile. “Herzen was appointed the place of exile in Perm, where he spent three weeks and then, on the orders of the authorities, was transferred to Vyatka, enrolled as a” clerk “to serve the governor Tyufyaevu. From Vyatka to Vladimir, and after Vladimir Herzen was allowed to live in St. Petersburg, but soon he was again in exile in Novgorod, thanks to the efforts of friends, Herzen managed to escape from Novgorod, to retire and move to Moscow. There he lived from 1842 to 1847 – the last period of his life in Russia. Herzen was drawn to Europe, but on Herzen’s requests for the issuance of a foreign passport for the treatment of his wife, Emperor Nicholas put a resolution: “Do not.” The conditions of Russian life terrified Herzen terribly; Meanwhile Ogarev was already abroad and from there wrote to his friend: “Herzen, but you can not live at home.” I am convinced that it is impossible. “A person who is alien to his family must break with his family.” In 1847 he finally arrived in Paris, then to Geneva, lived in Italy. After the appearance of “Letters from France and Italy”,...Herzen’s famous work “From the Other Bank” (originally also in German: “Von andern Ufer”) appeared in print. Burying his wife in Nice, Herzen moved to London, where he put the first machine of the free Russian press, which printed the magazines “The Polar Star” and “The Bell”, the first issue of which was published on July 1, 1857. The “bell” continued to be published until 1867. Herzen’s last period of life was for him a time of isolation from Russia and loneliness. “Fathers” recoiled from him for “radicalism,” and “children” – for “moderation.” Died 21 (old style – 9) January 1870 in Paris. Herzen was buried first in the Pere Lachaise cemetery, and then his ashes were transported to Nice, where it rests to the present day. Above the grave stands a beautiful, depicting Herzen standing at full length, with a face turned towards Russia, a monument to the work of Zabello. continued to go out until 1867. Herzen’s last period of life was for him a time of isolation from Russia and loneliness. “Fathers” recoiled from him for “radicalism,” and “children” – for “moderation.” Died 21 (old style – 9) January 1870 in Paris. Herzen was buried first in the Pere Lachaise cemetery, and then his ashes were transported to Nice, where it rests to the present day. Above the grave stands a beautiful, depicting Herzen standing at full length, with a face turned towards Russia, a monument to the work of Zabello. continued to go out until 1867. Herzen’s last period of life was for him a time of isolation from Russia and loneliness. “Fathers” recoiled from him for “radicalism,” and “children” – for “moderation.” Died 21 (old style – 9) January 1870 in Paris. Herzen was buried first in the Pere Lachaise cemetery, and then his ashes were transported to Nice, where it rests to the present day. Above the grave stands a beautiful, depicting Herzen standing at full length, with a face turned towards Russia, a monument to the work of Zabello. Herzen was buried first in the Pere Lachaise cemetery, and then his ashes were transported to Nice, where it rests to the present day. Above the grave stands a beautiful, depicting Herzen standing at full length, with a face turned towards Russia, a monument to the work of Zabello. Herzen was buried first in the Pere Lachaise cemetery, and then his ashes were transported to Nice, where it rests to the present day. Above the grave stands a beautiful, depicting Herzen standing at full length, with a face turned towards Russia, a monument to the work of Zabello.
Among the works are articles, novels, novels: “Notes of a Young Man” (autobiographical novel), “Moscow and St. Petersburg” (1842, a pamphlet disagreed in the lists, published in 1857), “Dilettantism in Science” (1843), “Letters on study of nature “(1845 – 1846),” Who is to blame? ” (1841 – 1846, novel), “Doctor Krupov” (1847, the story), “The Magpie” (1848, the story), “Duty first” (1851, novel), “Damaged” (1851, novel) William Penn “(drama),” Past and Thoughts “(1852 – 1868, autobiographical novel),” Boredom for the sake of “(1868 – 1869, essay),” Doctor, dying and dead “(1869, novel),” To the old comrade “(1869, letters are the last work).


Biography Herzen Alexander Ivanovich